Barcelona’s Palau Guell Mansion – Keep Calm and Wander

Author: , July 21st, 2018

Barcelona's Palau Guell Mansion - Keep Calm and Wander

The Palau Guell in Barcelona may look ordinary outside but wait until you step on inside. It’s splendid! Truly magnifique!

Barcelona is love not because of its 24/7 party scenes, but also because it has some of the most architecturally and artistically revered ancient buildings such as the Paul Guell Mansion.

I was in the city only for a few days and boy, there’s so much art around. And there’s no doubt that Gaudi rules above all other artists. In fact, Barcelona is also called “The City of Gaudi.” That’s how famous he is Catalan. His works are visible everywhere. Art was merely an excuse, I wanted to see Palau Guell – I wanted to see how how the wealthy aristocrats of the past resided in their designer mansions and how those very designers managed to create the residence of their dreams.

By Alain – Full Story at Keep Calm and Wander

Barcelona Gay Travel Resources

Palau de la Musica Catalana in Barcelona – Keep Calm and Wander

Author: , July 7th, 2018

Palau de la Musica Catalana - Keep Calm and Wander

A historic concert hall built in 1908, the Palau de la Musica Catalana is a turn-of-the-century piece of modern architecture by Lluis Domenech I Montaner. Its immaculate design, stained glasses, detailed mosaics, and expressive façade are some of the few things that attract tourists from around the world.

The building is serving the role for which it was initially constructed and that is providing a platform for the talented artists to showcase their talent in the most exuberant way possible. Owing to this fact, many famous artists, including Igor Stravinsky, Woody Allen, and Herbert Von Karajan have performed in this “Palace of Music.”

The modernist era was a movement more than a time period. It completely changed the very fabric of the architectural styles in Barcelona. The form of the palace or the hall speaks volumes of the craftsmanship of Lluis Domenech I Montaner. It is fluid, vibrant, and descriptive of the themes that the place is built on.

By Alain – Full Story at Keep Calm and Wander

Barcelona Gay Travel Resources

Amazing Views of Barcelona From Montjuic Castle – Keep Calm and Wander

Author: , July 2nd, 2018

Amazing Views of Barcelona From Montjuic Castle - Keep Calm and Wander

The views of Barcelona from Montjuic Castle is stunningly marvelous. Situated on the top of the Montjuic hill overlooking Barcelona, Castle Montjuic is an epitome of the resilience of Barcelona against the oppressions and invasions. Yet, it is also a monument of the victory of Spain over Catalan some 350 years ago. The victory is in the walls of the castle, in its spacious verandas, and its fortifications. You can see it everywhere and it augments as you overlook the city sprawling right in front of it. The castle indeed has witnessed not only many years of civil war and unrest in the 20th century, but also the growth of the city.

Well, that was just a brief history of this place. If you are an avid traveler and you have stepped on the soil of Barcelona, you’ve got to visit Castle Montjuic for the following reasons:

1. To see it speak its history

Running for about hour and a half, the guided tours of the castle are a great way to get to know about how it stood multiple invasions and warded off all the oppressors at the same time incarcerating prisoners itself. Aside from the history, the tours will also carry you through all the architectural significances of the castle, its built, the stones used, and the amalgam used to bind them. If you have no time for tours, you can, of course, wander around by yourself.

By Alain – Full Story at Keep Calm and Wander

Barcelona Gay Travel Resources

Five Gay Spanish Party Cities – The Nomadic Boys

Author: , June 13th, 2018

Five Gay Spanish Party Cities - The Nomadic Boys

Spain is famous for being very gay friendly and we absolutely love it!

As well as having some of the hottest men you’ll ever see, it also has some of the best gay parties we’ve been to, from the famous Madrid Pride, to Barcelona’s Circuit festivals. We’ve put together our 5 favourite gay cities in Spain to come and party like crazy.

Madrid

The Spanish capital is famous for being the best gay city for partying in Spain. We love visiting Madrid, whether it’s for Pride, or just an ad hoc weekend of partying. Either way, we know that a visit here is always going to be a lot of fun.

The Madrid Pride (“Orgullo Gay de Madrid”) takes place every year in June/July, and it is huge. It is famous for being one of the best and largest gay pride parades in the world with around 3-4 million people attending. We absolutely love it because as well as guaranteed beautiful weather (remember to pack plenty of sunblock cream!), the entire city gets involved and it becomes one giant rainbow street party. The focal point is around the gay neighbourhood in Chueca, where the bars spill out into the streets, and free outdoor concerts take place.

The annual WE Pride Festival in July is another huge party highlight in Madrid. It is 5 days of parties with the biggest brands and famous DJs.

During the winter months, there is another huge gay party: the We Party New Year Festival. This is the biggest gay winter event in Europe, with around 20,000 people attending to see in the New Year.

The gay clubs of Chueca always have a party taking places every weekend. The main ones are Boite, DLRO, MalaMala, Kluster and Baila Cariño. Just one word of advice, the Madrileños LOVE to party till the early hours of the next day – so fact in a disco nap before heading out!

By Stefan Arestis – Full Story at the Nomadic Boys

Spain Gay Travel Resources

Hospital Sant Pau: Barcelona’s Window to Art Nouveau – Keep Calm and Wander

Author: , April 4th, 2018

Hospital Sant Pau Barcelona - Keep Calm and Wander

The former hospital Sant Pau is Barcelona’s window to art nouveau. The moment you enter the gate, you know you’re inside a place that would take you to bygone times. You’d never even know that in the past, these buildings were used as hospitals. From outside, the pointed spires and well-decorated walls and windows give you a Gothic feel but wait until you see its interior.

I’m not really good at remembering addresses but it’s less than 10 minutes walk from Sagrada de Familia. My google map led me there. If you ask a local who lives around Sagrada, there’s no way he won’t know. If you find a gas station at the corner, and facing it, follow the street on its left lined with cafes. The closest subway/metro is Sant Pau or Dos de Main.

By Alain – Full Story at Keep Calm and Wander

Barcelona Gay Travel Resources

Barcelona’s Stunning Park Guell – Keep Calm and Wander

Author: , April 2nd, 2018

Barcelona's Stunning Park Guell - Keep Calm and Wander

Park Guell in Barcelona is visually stunning. I’m not only referring to the legacy of arts and architecture that Antoni Gaudi left but also to the nature and breathtaking views you’ll see from up here. You’ve never been to Barcelona if you’ve never been to Parc Guell. This is the city’s green space on a hill with views unequalled anywhere in the world. No wonder, this is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Though the Park Guell isn’t really in the centre of the city, public transport is accessible. There are buses that stop right in front of the gate from downtown. All you have to do is find the exact bus number. I found it using google maps. The nearest subway or metro is Lesseps. From here, you have to walk uphill for 15-20 minutes.

By Alain – Full Story at Keep Calm and Wander

Barcelona Gay Travel Resources

Hidden Barcelona – Keep Calm and Wander

Author: , March 30th, 2018

Hidden Barcelona - Keep Calm and Wander

Barcelona remains one of the most popular destinations to visit in Europe, attracting over 32 million people per year and it is easy to see why. This historic city, with its incredible architecture, energetic nightlife and famous beaches make this an attractive holiday destination for tourists. Barcelona also has a fantastic array of restaurants, including 24 Michelin-starred eateries such as ABaC, a three Michelin-starred restaurant in the heart of the city.

While it is exciting to see a different side of the city, there will be some things you won’t want to miss when you visit Barcelona. La Sagrada Família, Park Güell and La Catedral, for example, should all be on your must-see list. However, there are also some fascinating places that you can see in Barcelona that are not as obvious choices for tourists.

For example, you could pay a visit to the Museu Nacional de Art de Catalunya where you can admire the breathtaking views of the city as well as an amazing array of modern art. Don’t forget to check out the stunning waterfall!

By Alain – Full Story at Keep Calm and Wander

Barcelona Gay Travel Resources

The Facade of the Sagrada Familia – Keep Calm and Wander

Author: , May 12th, 2017

Sagrada Familia Barcelona - Alain

From afar, the Sagrada Familia is a towering Gothic structure that dominates the skyline of Barcelona. But if you get closer and look up, you’ll find yourself wondering on what the symbols on its facade mean or stand for. However, if you’re a devout Christian or Catholic, these symbols are easy peasy for you, right? I went to a Catholic High School, so, I’m kinda familiar to some of them.

The facade of Sagrada Familia is divided into three main gates. As you can see in the following photos below, they’re not your ordinary church doors. They’re grand and replete with tiny, detailed sculptures of religious origin.

By Alain – Full Story at Keep Calm and Wander

Gaudi’s Casa Pedrera, Barcelona – Keep Calm and Wander

Author: , May 11th, 2017

Casa Pedera

In Barcelona, there’s a house that the locals fondly call Casa Pedrera (or the Quarry). If you look at its facade, it really looks like a rugged quarry. However, its original name was Casa Mila. Anton Gaudi, Catalan’s most beloved architect built it for the wealthy Mila Family. This house was one of his last projects before he concentrated himself on building the city’s most iconic structure, the Sagrada Familia.

Before you enter Casa Pedrera or Casa Mila, look up and you’ll see the billowing edges of Casa Pedrera. They do look like a quarry, right? And, do you see those twisted, wrought-iron balconies? They’re awesome, eh?!

When you get inside (after paying, of course), you’ll be ushered into a simple courtyard with a staircase like this. Unfortunately, you’re not allowed to take these stairs that lead to private apartments.

By Alain – Full Story at Keep Calm and Wander

Eating Out: Barcelona

Author: , April 16th, 2017

Barcelona - Pixabay

According to an August 2015 report from LGBT Capital, an investment firm based in London and Hong Kong focused on the LGBT consumer market, Spain is Europe’s most valuable LGBT travel destination, with in-bound gay and lesbian visitors pumping in some $6.8 billion to the economy. That puts Spain second behind the US ($21.5 billion) among the 14 global nations counted in the report.

From Alicante to Zaragoza, Spain calls gay travelers to some 11 destinations country wide, but few come as hot as beautiful Barcelona. From bustling Eixample (locally, Gaixample), the city’s gay epicenter to the nude beaches of seaside gay-magnet Sitges, southwest of the city, Catalonia’s capital sizzles year-round.

With flamboyant fiestas including the legendary Sitges Carnival (February), Bear Pride (March), Pride Barcelona (late June into early July), and wild Circuit Festival (which celebrated its 10th anniversary this August) for visitors to enjoy, count Barcelona’s globally recognized culinary scene among the seductions, too.

From its beachfront snack bars (xiringuitos) to its 23 Michelin-starred restaurants, Barcelona’s food scene runs as hot as its men. Even going for coffee here is on an amorous level, per the Catalan phrase “Fotem un café?” or “Let’s make love to a coffee.” On that appetite-whetting possibility alone, here are just a few of the myriad ways to eat your heart out in Barcelona.

LA BOQUERIA

LA BOQUERIA - BarcelonaWith Catalonia designated the European Region of Gastronomy for 2016, Catalan cuisine, reaching back to medieval days has lasting African and Arabic influences, exemplifying the saying that “the history of the world is found on the plate.”

Based primarily on ingredients cultivated, foraged, and harvested from Catalonia’s bountiful seas, valleys, and mountains, the Catalan menu dances to its own exotic beat. Typically cooked in wine, brandy, or extra-virgin olive oil from some of the oldest olive trees in Europe, Catalan dishes characteristically contrast sweet and spicy or sweet and sour accents.

By Jeff Hailman – Full Story at Passport

Barcelona Gay Travel Resources