Big Sky, Montana for Queer Families – 2TravelDads

Big Sky, Montana brings to mind epic ski trips and exclusive mountain getaways in the snow, but did you know that it’s much more than that and it’s actually an incredible summer destination? Summer is considered the off-season in Big Sky but it’s just another cycle of fun. The Big Sky Resort is the ideal home base for that fun, and visiting off-season is perfect for getting the best deals and having the most diverse experiences. Here’s a complete plan for spending 4+ days and it’s all the best things to do in Big Sky, Montana.

We actually went twice in one summer, so we know this town well. Whether it’s a part of your Montana road trip or you’re adding onto a trip to Yellowstone National Park, the Big Sky Resort is easy to work into your Montana travel plan. Check it out!

We were welcomed by Visit Big Sky and Big Sky Resort, but are sharing our ideas and opinions at our own behest and discretion. We were hosted, yes, but we loved our time there! Also, there are some affiliate links in this article so, at no cost to you, we may get a small commission if you book something we recommended.

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Montana Gay Travel Resources

How Queer Families Choose a Travel Destination 0 Travel Pulse

gay family - pixabay

Choosing a family vacation destination is tough enough, with sometimes vastly different ideas of what would be cool to kids of different ages—not to mention what the parents want. But for queer families, there are added issues to consider. Is the destination welcoming? Does the family want to be with other queer families, or does that not matter to them?

There’s obviously no one-size-fits-all answer, but many LGBTQ families do consider whether the place they’re traveling is safe. Such is the case with New York-based Justin Huff, who travels with his husband and three-year-old child.

“I think safety is most important,” he said. “Being gay is one part of who I am and being safe and keeping my family safe is more important than beating someone over the head with sexual preference.”
And David Molino Dunn said that his family does tend to stay away from countries that have known anti-gay laws in place.

“We would rather avoid having a negative situation altogether. There are plenty of wonderful places we have yet to visit that would be much more welcoming to our family,” Dunn said. “I remember specifically driving a few extra hours to avoid having to stay the night in Mississippi one time. Better safe than sorry.”

Connecticut-based Dawn Ennis said that if it’s a place she feels safe, she doesn’t out herself or her queer children. But she’s generally not afraid to wear a transgender symbol or attire that speaks to LGBTQ rights.

By Paul Heney – Full Story at SOURCE