Udaipur City Palace – Our Taste for Life

Udaipur City Palace - Our Taste for Life

The Udaipur City Palace is a top tourist attraction and architectural marvel in Udaipur. Located on the banks of Lake Pichola, the opulent building is a seamless blend of Medieval, European, and Chinese architecture. Of all the palaces in Rajasthan, Udaipur is the largest, and arguably the most impressive.

Building works for Udaipurs’ City Palace commenced in 1559, although renovations and additions continued well into the 19th century. Today, the complex is made up of a series of exquisite palaces, gardens, and courtyards. No sightseeing tour in Udaipur is complete without visiting the City Palace, which provides a fascinating insight into the cities history.

In this guide, we advise everything you need to know ahead of visiting the Udaipur City Palace. Including entrance fees, how to get there, what to expect & more.

Udaipur City Palace – Getting There

Udaipur is an essential addition to any Rajasthan itinerary. It is one of the most popular tourist cities in the country and forms a part of our suggested one month in India Route. You can conveniently reach Udaipur via bus, train, or plane from all over the country.

Set peacefully upon the eastern banks of Lake Pichola, the City Palace can easily be reached on foot if you are staying in the city. Alternatively, you can take a rickshaw or taxi which are easy to come by in Udaipur.

By Charlotte & Natalie – Full Story at Our Taste for Life

India Lesbian Travel Resources

Ahar Cenotaphs in Udaipur, India – Our Taste for Life

Visiting the Ahar Cenotaphs is one of the more unique things to do in Udaipur and could be considered somewhat of a hidden gem. Yes, despite being a spot of historical significance, many tourists erroneously it. While we, on the other hand, regard Ahar Cenotaphs to be one of the top places to visit in Udaipur in 2 days!

You see, Ahar is essentially a Royal cemetery for Udaipur’s late Maharajas. However, what might sound like a dark place on paper is, in fact, a spot of peace and serenity. Furthermore, if you are at all interested in Rajasthani architecture, you are sure to be left in awe by the intricately carved stone tombs.

In this guide, we advise everything you need to know ahead of visiting Ahar Cenotaphs in Udaipur. Including entrance fees, opening times, what to expect & more.

Ahar Cenotaphs Udaipur – A 2019 Sightseeing Guide

Udaipur is an essential addition to any Rajasthan itinerary. It is one of the most popular tourist cities in the country and forms a part of our suggested one month in India Route. You can conveniently reach Udaipur via bus, train, or plane from all over the country.

Set on the outskirts of the city, 2km away from Lake Pichola, the Ahar Cenotaphs can easily be reached on foot if you don’t mind working up a sweat. Alternatively, you can take a rickshaw or taxi, which are both easy to come by in Udaipur.

Full Story at Our Taste for Life

India Gay Travel Resources

Nahargarh Fort in Jaipur, India – Our Taste for Life

Nahargarh Fort is a tourist hotspot in the magical city of Jaipur. Located high in the Aravali mountains, the breathtaking fortress provides an unrivalled view over the bustling city below. The fort is famed for being an architectural wonder, as well as being one of the best sunset spots in Jaipur.

Historically, along with Amer Fort and Jaigarh Fort, Nahargarh helped form a defence wall around the old Royal City. The name ‘Nahargarh’ translates to Tiger Fort in English, so I can only assume wild tigers once roamed the same mountains. As you sit atop the walls of the old fort, it’s easy to picture the scene. After all, Jaipur was once a barren desert city. We consider Nahargarh Fort to be one of the best places to visit in Jaipur, as mentioned in our 2-day Jaipur Itinerary.

In this guide, we advise everything you need to know ahead of visiting Nahargarh Fort in Jaipur. Including entrance fees, opening times, what to expect & more. 

Nahargarh Fort Jaipur – A Reliable 2019 Guide

Jaipur is an essential addition to any India itinerary. It is one of the most visited cities in the country and forms a part of the Golden Triangle Route. You can conveniently reach Jaipur via bus, train, or plane from all over the country.

Located roughly 30-40 minutes outside of the city centre, the easiest way to reach Nahargarh Fort is by taxi or tuk-tuk. Although, the tuk-tuks tend to struggle on the steep hair pinned road to the fort entrance, so taxis are the quicker option.

However you choose to travel, it pays to organise a return trip with your driver. The drivers who wait outside the fort are known to charge extortionate rates because they know your options are limited. By agreeing on a price beforehand, you will avoid any trouble on the return journey.

Full Story at Our Taste for Life

India Gay Travel Resources

Gay Varanasi, India – The Nomadic Boys

Gay Varanasi, India - The Nomadic Boys

Varanasi: a city where you see every facet of life before your very eyes! From intense worshipping by pilgrims along the River Ganges to open-casket funerals along the ghats, it’s full of life going on everywhere you look!

Read moreGay Varanasi, India – The Nomadic Boys

India’s Golden Triangle – Our Taste for Life

India's Golden Triangle - Our Taste for Life

The Golden Triangle Itinerary in India, otherwise known as the Delhi-Agra-Jaipur circuit, is one of the most common travel routes in the country. If you only have a short time in India, it’s the perfect route to get a taste for what this wild country is all about.

Read moreIndia’s Golden Triangle – Our Taste for Life

One Month in India – Our Taste for Life

One Month in India - Our Taste for Life

Backpacking for one month in India and need some guidance on where to go? Don’t worry, we have got you covered. It can be a daunting task planning your route in this truly vast and diverse country. So with this in mind, we share a few different backpacking India routes, suitable for a one month trip in India. Furthermore, we will share all the best places to see in India, our top tips, where to stay, budget and more.

Read moreOne Month in India – Our Taste for Life

Queer India – Fodors

queer India - pixabay

It is generally accepted that clichés often have an element of truth to them. This holds in the case of India too. You won’t necessarily find elephants and snake charmers jostling for elbow room in the city (probably), but you can expect contradictions that boggle the mind. Here, various aspects of diversity intersect in a web so layered and complex that even natives struggle to get their head it around at times. You can expect color, noise, laughter, food, crowds—for everything else, leave those preconceptions at home.

India is no herald of LGBTQ+ rights. This is despite evidence of a spectrum of sexualities in historical times. While transgender individuals are legally allowed to self-identify as male, female, or other, it was only in September 2018 that Section 377, a British-era remnant of homophobia, was read down by the Supreme Court. But Section 377 or not, there are an estimated 100-million+ queer individuals in India. And just like in any other part of the world, they have continued to fall in love, built lives together, and traveled with their near and dear for eons. And ironically, their biggest threat—a deeply conservative society—is also what keeps them safe. In other words, if one is willing to pick one’s battles and co-opt certain cultural norms to one’s advantage, traveling as a gay (gay referring to a range of sexualities) individual or couple can be exactly the adventure you imagine. In short: when in India, do as (gay) Indians do.

The Cloak of Invisibility

The worst thing that has ever happened to Ashdeen, 38, while traveling with a partner, is being given separate beds. “Annoying,” is the word he uses, and he laughs as he says it. He might as well, because this is very likely the only battle you will fight as a queer couple in India. Not many travelers see it as overt homophobia, though. “I think people are just used to a certain idea of what the norm is,” says John, 53, who’s partner was noted as “Mrs” in a fancy hotel. “If it was a dive, I understand that, but this was, you know, supposedly a five-star.” John, who’s from the US, and whose husband is Indian (they married in the US), did get the mistake corrected.

By Payal Dhar – Full Story at Fodors

Queer India Travel Resources

 

Visiting India After the Decriminalization of Gay Sex – Gay Star News

India - pixabay

India made history by becoming the next country to decriminalize gay sex. The seventh largest state’s supreme court overturned Section 337 today (6 September 2018) after hearing petitions from lawyers representing LGBTI activists. The ban dates back to colonial times and outlawed sexual activities ‘outside the order of nature’. This included homosexual sex.

But its repeal is a landmark in civil rights for the LGBTI community in India. 1.35 billion people live in the country, making it the largest decriminalization in history. So to celebrate, let’s look at just how beautiful India is.

1 Yumthang Valley, Sikkim

Also known as the Valley of Flowers, this beautiful spot is filled with hot springs, yaks, and meadows, centered on a river and surrounded by the Himalayas.

2 Tea Gardens, Munnar

If you can’t think about starting your day without a cup of tea, then you need to visit these Tea Gardens. Rolling hills of green make it one of the most beautiful places to visit in India.

By Tom Capon – Full Story at Gay Star News

India Gay Travel Resources

Gay India – The Nomadic Boys

Gay India - The Nomadic Boys

We spent several months travelling in India as a gay couple, from North to South, and absolutely loved it.

We visited world famous monuments like the Taj Mahal and stunning palaces across Rajasthan. We were in awe at the intense spirituality in Varanasi, chilled in the popular backwaters of Kerala, and loved all the delicious Indian food we tried. But our absolute highlight was the people. The Indians stole our heart. As well as being full of charm and character, they were very hospitable and never disrespectful to us. We found them to be welcoming, curious, very friendly, and eager to show off their country to these two foreigners.

On the face of it, India does not appear to be very gay friendly, particularly as the Supreme Court ruled in 2013 to uphold the colonial laws dating back to 1861 banning sex between two consenting men. Whilst this law was decriminalised by the High Court of Delhi in 2009, it was subsequently overturned by the Supreme Court because the judges concluded that such an amendment should be left to parliament to decide, and not the judiciary. The law is thankfully being reviewed again in the Supreme Court – a testament to how strong the LGTBQ community is in India.

In practice, gay relationships do of course exist and thrive in India, as they do in any other country. However, social norms in India tend to discourage public display of affection no matter sexual orientation.

But do the maths – this is a country with a population of over 1.3 billion people, which means statistically there are around 130 million gay boys waiting to welcome you.

By Stefan Arestis – Full Story at The Nomadic Boys

India Gay Travel Resources

Sandakphu on a Budget – Seattle Lesbian

India - Pixabay

A trek in the hills is the perfect getaway from the dull city life. The crisp mountain air and the thrill of scaling summits – such is the magnetism of trekking in the hills. If you are an adventure-seeker keen on experiencing the outdoors, Sandakphu is close by. Easy to reach from the eastern part of India, it features on the bucket-list of many eager travelers.

Trains ply to the New Jalpaiguri Junction, the railway station nearest to Sandakphu. From New Jalpaiguri, you will find buses and cars to take you to the charming hill station of Darjeeling. Plan your trek from there. It does not have to cost the earth. With careful planning and prior bookings, you can trek to Sandakphu on a budget and also squeeze in a mini-vacation in Darjeeling. Here is how you complete a trek to Sandakphu on a humble budget.

THE SONG OF SINGALILA

Sandakphu is the highest summit of the Singalila Range. This trek is also called the Singalila Trek as it will take you along the Singalila Range. Visitors flock to Sandakphu for panoramic views of the Himalayas – Mount Everest, Kanchenjunga, Lhotse, and Makalu.

By Samantha Martin – Full Story at Seattle Lesbian

India Gay Travel Resources