Bali’s Kecak Dance – Everything To Sea

Bali, often nicknamed “The Island of the Gods” or sometimes “The Island of a Thousand Temples”, is known as a mythical place rich with art and culture, fascinating its visitors. 

One thing the Balinese still maintain is the famous Kecak. Part ritual, part art-performance, part dance, Kecak is carried out by about 100 bare-chested men wearing nothing but black-and-white sarongs. It is meant to illustrate the world’s diversity. For the Balinese, it’s important that each aspect of the world is in balance. The concept is that there are many differences in the cosmos, and they should strive to be in harmony. Kecak is often performed before sunset surrounded by breathtaking views, such as the oft-visited temple in Uluwatu. 

Kecak was inspired by the Sang Hyang dance and Ramayana stories. Sang Hyang is a form of ritual dance where the performers are in trance, so they can communicate with the Gods – as well as their own ancestors – and therefore deliver their message. The Ramayana itself is a story depicted in Hindu scriptures. It tells the battle between the good King Rama with an Evil King, Rahwana, in an attempt to save Rama’s wife Dewi Sita. The good king is aided by the monkey god, Hanuman. In Kecak performance, men sit in concentric circles chanting “chak – chak – chak”, representing a full army of monkeys.

One might wonder what musical instruments they use during it. Kecak is actually performed without any instruments – it’s a capella. The sounds come from the mouths of all of the performers who vocalize the chants, as well as from metal bells that are attached to the dancers’ ankles.

By Eddie Rahadian – Full Story at Everything To Sea.

Everything To Sea runs all-male, clothing-optional trips on traditional wooden yachts in the calm seas of Indonesia. As a travel operator, they specialize in excursions for men of all orientations, that center around freedom, camaraderie, friendship, and honesty. 

Since January 2019, Everything To Sea has been exploring natural environments and giving guys one-of-a-kind, life-changing experiences. Trips range from private journeys for individuals to small-group departures for up to 12 men. Their ships are also available for existing men’s groups, such as yoga or tantric communities, who are seeking unforgettable journeys.

Thailand’s Trans Culture – The Nomadic Boys

BLOG - Thailand's Trans Culture - The Nomadic Boys

As soon as we mention we’re going to Bangkok, our (straight male) friends are quick to shower us with the “ladyboy” jokes also offering advice on “how to spot them“!

We always try to challenge stereotypes about transgender people in Thailand, the most common usually emanating from a guy’s fear that “they” are plotting to trap and seduce him. The reality, of course, is that “they” really are not! Most are simply trying to lead a normal everyday life, just like you and me, in a world that still hasn’t fully accepted its transgender community.

We have many transgender friends around the world who we’ve met in our travels, like Finn from Berlin. We take great pride in the LGBTQ bond that unites us: as gay men we are ultimately part of the same rainbow family, undergoing the same daily struggles of acceptance. We, therefore, take great pride in using our online platform to have an educative influence for transgender issues by challenging stereotypes and promoting a positive image of our transgender brothers and sisters.

One of our very good trans friends is Regina, who we met when we were out partying in the gay bars of Bangkok. Like us, Regina loves travelling and has stories from all around the world to share. Regina was also open to telling us all about her transition as well as her experience living/working as a trans person in Asia.

By Stefan Arestis – Full Story at the Nomadic Boys

Thailand Gay Travel Resources