Gay Philadelphia – The Hornet

Author: , February 23rd, 2018

Gay Philadelphia

Philadelphia, founded in 1682, played a significant role in shaping America. This city was where the Founding Fathers signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776. From there, Philadelphia became one of the leading industrial cities during the 19th century. Today, the City of Brotherly Love continues to thrive. There’s also quite a lot to explore in gay Philadelphia, as the city has one of the nation’s most vibrant LGBTQ neighborhoods known as the Gayborhood.

There are a total of 67 national landmarks in Philadelphia. You can spend a whole week just sightseeing! The Liberty Bell, the most iconic American symbol, is a great place to start your tour. Find it at the Liberty Bell Center (oddly enough) in Independence National Historical Park.

The Betsy Ross House, several blocks away from the Liberty Bell, is a tiny museum and a landmark where the seamstress and flagmaker Betsy Ross lived when she sewed the first American flag. Take a tour of the house and relive the days of how Ross lived.

The Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site is a must-visit place for fans of his work. This house, the only surviving residence of Poe, is in the Spring Garden neighborhood of Philadelphia. Check out different rooms while savoring Poe’s famous works like “The Raven” during the tour.

By Charles Thompson-Wang – Full Story at The Hornet

Philadelphia Gay Travel Resources

Lancaster B&B – Gay Lancaster Bed & Breakfast

Author: , January 11th, 2018

Lancaster B&B

The Lancaster is a fine old house built in the 1912 Dutch Colonial style. A craftsmen-cottage sense of place and tasteful, inviting decor welcomes our guests to relax and rejuvenate at their own pace.At the inn, all rooms offer stocked private baths, bathrobes, and electric fireplaces. Satellite television/dvd players, wi-fi throughout the property, complimentary refreshments and cozy common spaces keep you connected and entertained when staying in, and extensive maps, brochures, and our in-step local knowledge keep you informed when you choose to explore.

Situated on the perimeter of the vibrant, creative downtown of Lancaster city, where cool shops, great galleries, quality theatre, and wow-factor restaurants and pubs are all close by, The Lancaster bed and breakfast is only minutes away from the inspiring Amish countryside. The fascinating and friendly Amish and Mennonite cultures pepper the farmland, ready to educate, inspire, and charm you with handsome homesteads and businesses of produce, preserves, quilts, and crafts.

And of course, the marvelous full gourmet breakfasts at The Lancaster will please all palettes, as your innkeepers, Brad and Keith, pride themselves on graciously accommodating the tastes and needs of their guests. You will not leave hungry but you will leave enriched.

See the Lancaster B&B Expanded Listing on Purple Roofs Here

Lancaster Gay Friendly Bed and Breakfasts, Hotels, and Vacation Rentals

Hotel Fauchere – Gay Poconos Hotel

Author: , July 6th, 2017

Hotel Fauchere

Periodically we’ll feature one of our properties here to let our readers know about some great gay friendly places to stay:

The Hotel Fauchere offers guests a “home away from home” experience, with fine dining in our Delmonico Room, a stylish bistro Bar Louis and a “guest only” conservatory and garden. We also offer the Emerson House at the Hotel Fauchere, an event venue perfect for small groups, parties and business meetings and retreats.

Your experience at our Poconos hotel starts with your reservation – we offer in-room check-in and a personalized rest experience, all arranged before you arrive. We work hard to anticipate all your needs, and pay close attention to all the details.

Each of our luxurious guest rooms offers a queen bed, flatscreen television with cable, phone, climate control, Kiehl’s bath amenities, Bose clock radio, radiant heat bathroom floors, warming towel racks and a hair dryer.

Our beds can also be customized for the ultimate sleeping experience , and include an 11″ firm mattress, a 2 inch feather bed, and two twin down comforters. Bed linens are Egyptian cotton from Frette, Italy.

Our rooms also include a bottle of wine, fine water and artisan chocolates made by the hotel’s wonderful pastry chef. Our decor is stylish and luxurious, including our original hardwood floors, beautiful Carrerra marble in our bathrooms, and Pennsylvania blue stone.

The Hotel Fauchere has wifi and DSL internet access, free for guest use, and can also provide iPod audio docking systems upon request.

We serve a continental breakfast every morning in The Delmonico Room.

Hotel Fauchere’s guests enjoy priority reservations and seating in The Delmonico Room and in Bar Louis. Parking in the hotel’s private lot is also included in the price of your stay.

Coming to the Poconos? Stay in luxury at the Hotel Fauchere!

Cancellation Policy: Two weeks prior to the arrival date, a full refund will be provided. One week prior to arrival, there will be a 50% refund for the entire stay. There will be no refund for reservations cancelled within the week of arrival.

See the Hotel Fauchere Expanded Listing on Purple Roofs Here

Gay Friendly Bed and Breakfasts, Hotels, and Vacation Rentals in the Poconos

Enchanting, Lesbian Philadelphia – Windy City

Author: , May 19th, 2017

Philadelphia

Philadelphia, the nation’s fourth largest city, feels vibrant, its walls covered in more than 3,500 murals, its narrow streets buzzing with excitement—and traffic. Streets can be packed with nightlife at two in the morning, but it feels rather like a carnival than an annoyance.

Despite the traffic, bicycles abound in lesbian Philadelphia. The Indego system—a bike share like Chicago’s Divvy—only costs $4 per half-hour ride. As long as you accept that the streets only have numbers sometimes, the grid system is easy to follow, and in the corners of the city you’ll find charming squares with sculptures, trees and benches. Staying in a Kimpton Hotel means you get free bike rental, though, as long as you return by sundown. The Hotel Palomar, in the middle of Center City, has a funky rock ‘n’ roll groove to it and personable, helpful staff who might offer you champagne at check-in.

When thinking about lesbian Philadelphia, art is not the first thing that comes to mind. Yet within a half-mile of each other exist the Philadelphia Museum of Art, home of the picturesque rocky steps, its smaller offshoot the Rodin Museum, and the Barnes Foundation. The Rodin Museum is a beautiful small repository of the sculptor’s works, including The Gates of Hell, one of his masterpieces.

The Barnes Foundation, a treasure trove of impressionism, is notable for staying true to its collector’s vision, despite a controversial move from the outskirts of town to the city itself—and for its utter lack of signage. Instead, visitors absorb the art with sly hints Barnes installed by the work, metal objects like keys and ladles indicating fundamental shapes in the painting below. It’s an unusual and ultimately incredibly rewarding way to view these priceless works, and is a must-see experience for an art lover.

By Liz Baudler – Full Story at Windy City

Philadelphia Gay Travel Resources

Hershey Park Announces Trans-Friendly Policy

Author: , May 23rd, 2016

Hershey Park

From Hershey Park press release:

Every year, the employees of Hershey Entertainment & Resorts (HE&R) welcome over 6 million guests from down the street and around the world. We recognize that the more perspectives we have within our company, the more welcoming we are to all those who visit and seek employment here. In fact, our company has four core values, one of which is “respectful of others,” which we define as treating all people with dignity, while respecting their differences and ideas.

For decades, Hersheypark has been dedicated to the safety and security of our guest and employees. It is foundational to our brand. Additionally, the Park has and will always strive to accommodate all guests and employees – including members of the LGBT community – to ensure those visiting or working at Hersheypark are comfortable and feel secure. To that end, the Park will continue its practice of treating all guests and employees the same no matter race, ethnicity, sexual identity, etc. Guests and employees may continue to use the restrooms with which they gender-identify, or are welcome to use the many family restrooms available across the destination.

Full Story at Joe.My.God

LOCATION Gay Travel Resources

Other Gay Travel Events

Gay Philadelphia: The Rodin Museum

Author: , May 7th, 2016

Rodin Museum - Philadelphia

The Thinker - Rodin MuseumGay Philadelphia is home to some amazing museums. We visited one of them while we were there – the Rodin (pronounced “roh-daan”) museum.

Most of us are familiar with Rodin’s “The Thinker” – a seated man with his head on his fist, deep in thought. When we found out that “The Thinker” was there at the Philadelphia Rodin Museum, we were excited. How often do you get to see such an iconic piece of art first-hand?

Then we learned a little more about the casting process.

Rodin MuseumA sculptor like Rodin makes the original mold in his studio, and then creates or licenses a certain number of copies, or “casts”, that can be made with it. The Philadelphia museum opened in 1929, and many of the sculptures were cast around that date.

But Auguste Rodin died in 1917.

So most of the works we saw were actually made by others, using the molds Rodin created.

Rodin MuseumIt’s strange, thinking that the actual art in front of you was not created by the man whose name is on it. It’s also strange knowing it’s not the only copy.

“The Thinker”, for instance, comes in several sizes. The largest of these has 28 copies scattered around the world. And there are more of the smaller version.

Rodin MuseumWhen you go to see the Mona Lisa at the Louvre, you are seeing the one and only copy of DaVinci’s masterpiece. It’s a singular experience, by nature.

Still, seeing so many of Rodin’s casts in one place is an amazing thing – it’s the second largest collection of his work, outside of Paris.

Philadelphia Gay Travel Resources

 

Gay Philadelphia: The Views!

Author: , May 6th, 2016

Gay Philadelphia - views

Whenever we visit a new city, we like to find a great place to see the views.

Gay Philadelphia - City HallIn Philadelphia, surprisingly, this is the gorgeous, recently restored City Hall. Tickets to the Observation Deck were cheap – just $6 when we were there. You have to get a ticket in advance – they go up every 15 minutes – and you can either call the visitor center at City Hall at (215) 686-2840, or you can stop by.

It’s a bit tricky to find. City Hall is massive. We started at the entrance at the southeastern corner of the building, where you go through a security check – but that was the wrong place. To find the visitor center, start on the south side, where Broad Street runs into the building. Enter through the main walkway. The visitor center will be on your right in the tunnel just before you reach the courtyard.

We were waylaid a bit by a last-minute VIP who wanted to see the view (eliciting grumbles from the staff) but we did eventually make it to the top. It was well worth the cost.

Gay Philadelphia - views

Gay Philadelphia - views

Philadelphia Gay Travel Resources

Gay Philadelphia: Public Art

Author: , May 4th, 2016

gay Philadelphia

One of the things we absolutely loved about our visit to gay Philadelphia in October was the amazing amount of public art – murals and statues and the like.

Of course, we had to get a photo of the famous “Love” sculpture – and did you know there’s one in Spanish too?

But there is so much more to see scattered throughout the downtown core. One plaza is covered in giant pieces from various board games we loved as children. And walls all over the city are plastered with gorgeous murals, including the LGBT one on the side of the Center.

Here are some of our favorites!

<

Philadelphia Gay Travel Resources

Gay Philadelphia

Gay Philadelphia

Gay Philadelphia

Gay Philadelphia

Gay Philadelphia

Gay Philadelphia

IMG_7848

Gay Philadelphia

Gay Philadelphia

Gay Philadelphia

Gay Philadelphia

Gay Philadelphia: Elfreth’s Alley

Author: , May 2nd, 2016

Elfreth's Alley

Elfreth's AlleyLate last year, we visited gay Philadelphia. It was our first time in this amazing, diverse city, and we’re just finally getting around to sharing it with y’all.

One of our favorite things in the city was Elfreth’s Alley. It’s a tiny, one-block section of the city, tucked away om the east side close to the Delaware River. The whole city sits between the Delaware and the Schuylkill Rivers, one to the East and the other to the West.

Elfreth’s Alley is fascinating. It’s called the “nation’s oldest residential street.” The street was created in 1702, and the houses there date from 1728 to 1806. The houses on the south side of the street were built under British occupation, and are shorter than the others and fly British flags. The ones on the north side were built after the Revolution, and are taller, with American flags.

Elfreth's Alley panorama

If you look closely, you can see little metal emblems on many of the houses. At the time, you had to pay for fire protection, and the company you chose would put their emblem on your house. Just so they didn’t accidentally save a house that hadn’t been paid for.

Elfreth's Alley panorama

We took our tour of historic Philadelphia with an outfit called Urban Tours. The guide there was friendly and very knowledgeable, and actually lived in the neighborhood.

Elfreth’s Alley is a really cool place to see and take pictures the next time you’re in Philly.

Guide to Philadelphia Neighborhoods

Author: , April 23rd, 2016

Philadelphia

As someone who’s lived in Philadelphia for over a decade now, there’s one thing I can tell you with no hesitation: it’s a city of neighborhoods. While of course this applies to just about any city, it’s particularly marked in Philadelphia, where a few minutes’ stroll can bring you to a totally different atmosphere. Of course, there are things that united the city into a cohesive whole, including its combination of history and modernity, the gay-friendly quality that consistently lands it at the top of rankings by LGBT groups, and the immensely walkable nature of the “Center City” area, which is where we’ll spend most of our time. Set between two rivers, and only thirty blocks wide and about ten blocks long, with numbered streets going north/south and (mostly) tree-named streets east/west, the Philadelphia’s center city is a paradise for walkers. So let’s go on a tour of the City of Brotherly and Sisterly love, neighborhood by neighborhood. I think you’ll like the things we discover. I’m just sayin’.

The Gayborhood: At the Heart of Things

PhiladelphiaWe’ll start, of course, in the Gayborhood (aka Midtown Village), which is geographically as well as thematically a great place to begin, as it’s pretty much in the heart of Center City. For our purposes, we’ll call the Gayborhood the district from 10th to Broad Streets (Broad is the equivalent of 14th), and Market down to Pine. It’s here that you’ll find almost all the LGBT nightlife, and one of the most pleasant neighborhoods in the city.

Good news: you can stay right in the Gayborhood. For convenience and appeal, I love Alexander Inn, a boutique hotel at Spruce and 12th that couldn’t be more perfectly located. Add to that Alexander’s nice rooms, super-helpful staff, and great breakfast buffet in their cozy living room, and what we have here is a winner. On the edge of the neighborhood, Loews Hotel, built in America’s first skyscraper, offers the style and friendliness we’ve come to associate with Loews.

By Rich Rubin – Full Story at Passport

Philadelphia Gay Travel Resources