Blossoms in the Hood River Valley, Oregon

Author: , April 6th, 2014

09may23-2-300x225We get this question a lot in the spring.  Because who wouldn’t want to celebrate spring in one of the largest fruit growing regions in our Nation?  Over 15,000 acres of fruit trees, that’s over 2 million trees, putting on a show over a three or four week span with Mt Hood dressed in its spring best as a backdrop.

You see, the Hood River Valley is about 20 miles long, spanning from majestic Mt Hood and the Upper Hood River Valley where Parkdale and the Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast is located, north to the town of Hood River and the Columbia River Gorge. The three tiered Hood River Valley rises from 90 feet above sea level in Hood River to over 2500′ in the Upper Hood River valley, so we can have upwards of a three, sometimes 4 week span of bloom, Hood River Blooming first and those in the Upper Valley later.

So to answer your question:  When planning your spring visit to the Old Parkdale Inn I advise our guests to visit around the first of May when the Inn, which sits at an elevation of 1750′, is surrounded by acres and acres of awesomeness.   You’ll find answers to your questions on our AskOPI FAQ page on Facebook.

Our Sensual Spring Mid Week Special runs through May and we still have rooms available for Blossom Fest, a three week celebration in the Hood River Valley.  Family fruit stands reopen.  Wineries feature new wines.  First annual Hard Pressed Cider Fest and of course the main event: Blossoms

Purple Roofs Guest Blogger:  Mary Pellegrini, owner/innkeeper at the Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast in the Upper Hood River Valley, Oregon.  We are about an hour and a half east of Portland, Oregon, a scenic drive through the Columbia River Gorge and the Hood River Valley to our B&B at the base of Oregon’s tallest mountain, majestic Mt Hood.

Cozy Winter Nights at the Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast

Author: , December 6th, 2013

It seems like it’s been forever since I’ve written a blog post, for myself or for Purple Roofs.  But now that winter has set in seems like I have more time to reflect and share with you the Hood River Valley, Oregon, and the Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast.  Just in time for our Cozy Winter Nights Special

We invite you to experience the quiet Winter Months in the Hood River Valley and surrounding forest.  A spectacular B&B experience at the Old Parkdale Inn situated in the abundant beauty of the Hood River Valley with majestic views of Mt Hood.

Parkdale, Oregon, is the halfway spot along the Mt Hood Scenic Byway, and the Old Parkdale Inn B&B is in the heart of this quiet hamlet.  You’ll get a two-night stay for two, Sundays through Thursday through January 30, 2014, for $189.00.  Your deal, valued at $290, includes a hearty breakfast to start your day and the serenity that comes with spending an evening at the Old Parkdale Inn.

Choose any one of our three guest rooms, each with amenities including a private bath, flat-screen satellite TV and DVD player, microwave, coffee maker, refrigerator, and Free wireless Internet.  You may want to relax in your room or in our tranquil gardens.

The Old Parkdale Inn, only 85 miles from Portland on the north slopes of Mt Hood

The Old Parkdale Inn, only 85 miles from Portland on the north slopes of Mt Hood

The Old Parkdale Inn is located on the famous Hood River County Fruit Loop,  perfectly situated to tour the area’s gorgeous farms, wineries and orchards.  Most of the businesses stay open through Christmas but then it gets pretty sleepy up here in the Hood River Valley.  But that’s one of the bonuses of a winter stay.  Should you choose to head outdoors and have a go at an awesome winter sport you’ll enjoy the quiet serenity at the Old Parkdale Inn when you return.

Come mealtime, head for craft beer and a wild rice burger at Solera Brewery, just a few blocks from the inn.  Sorry Folks, they’re closed on Wednesday. Also walking distance from the Inn, Apple Valley BBQ, closed Monday and Tuesday, serves up top-quality meats, amazing side dishes and a hefty dose of small-town hospitality.  Only minutes from the Mt Hood National Forest you can enjoy, depending on your arrival date, to ski Mount Hood Meadows, XC ski or take a hike to Bald Butte or Tamanawas Falls.  Cycling is quite popular and miles and miles of mountain biking trails and scenic forest roads challenge our cycling guests.  Again this year we will have discount lift tickets to both Mt Hood Meadows Ski Resort and Timberline Ski Area.  These ski areas typically open around Thanksgiving.  Pray for snow!

The two-night midweek stay must be booked Sunday through Thursday now and January 30, 2014, for $189.00 and cannot include a Saturday or Friday night.   Stay must be two consecutive nights.

Share this special with your family and friends.  Maybe they’d like to join you for a memorable getaway to the Old Parkdale Inn.

Purple Roofs Guest Blogger:  Mary Pellegrini, owner/innkeeper at the Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast in the Upper Hood River Valley, Oregon.  We are about an hour and a half east of Portland, Oregon, a scenic drive through the Columbia River Gorge and the Hood River Valley to our B&B at the base of Oregon’s tallest mountain, majestic Mt Hood.

Featured Gay Friendly Accommodations: Enchanted Mt Hood Retreat, Welches, Oregon

Author: , April 5th, 2013

Enchanted Mt Hood Retreat, Welches, OregonPeriodically we’ll feature one of our properties here to let our readers know about some great gay friendly places to stay.

Relax in Luxury on Mt Hood: This beautifully appointed and newly renovated cabin is the ideal private retreat for one or two couples. Situated in a storybook forest setting, this elegant and sophisticated cabin offers the finest amenities available. The gourmet kitchen comes complete with a CornuFe stove, state-of-the-art appliances all hidden from view thanks to handsome cabinetry and black slate floors.

See the Enchanted Mt Hood Retreat Expanded Listing on Purple Roofs Here

Gay Friendly Bed and Breakfasts, Hotels, and Vacation Rentals in the Mt. Hood Area

Geocaching in the Hood River Valley Oregon

Author: , March 21st, 2012

Geocaching allows one to get out and about

Did you know that Geocaching started right here in Oregon?  A little history lesson, the full version can be read on the Geocaching.com history page from where I’ve gotten this information.

“Geocaching is a high-tech treasure hunting game played throughout the world by adventure seekers equipped with GPS devices. The basic idea is to locate hidden containers, called geocaches, outdoors and then share your experiences online. Geocaching is enjoyed by people from all age groups, with a strong sense of community and support for the environment.  Geocaching.com is the headquarters for the activity”  On this site you can read the history of Geocaching.

* On May 2, 2000, at approximately midnight, eastern savings time, the great blue switch* controlling selective availability was pressed. Twenty-four satellites around the globe processed their new orders, and instantly the accuracy of GPS technology improved tenfold. Tens of thousands of GPS receivers around the world had an instant upgrade. Now, anyone could “precisely pinpoint their location or the location of items (such as game) left behind for later recovery.” How right they were.

* On May 3 a GPS enthusiast, Dave Ulmer, computer consultant, wanted to test the accuracy by hiding a navigational target in the woods. He called the idea the “Great American GPS Stash Hunt” and posted it in an internet GPS users’ group. The idea was simple: Hide a container out in the woods and note the coordinates with a GPS unit.  On May 3rd he placed his own container, a black bucket, in the woods near Beavercreek, Oregon, near Portland.

* Within three days, two different readers read about his stash on the Internet, used their own GPS receivers to find the container, and shared their experiences online.  Like many new and innovative ideas on the Internet, the concept spread quickly – but this one required leaving your computer to participate.

* Within the first month, Mike Teague, the first person to find Ulmer’s stash, began gathering the online posts of coordinates around the world and documenting them on his personal home page. The “GPS Stash Hunt” mailing list was created to discuss the emerging activity.

* Geocaching.com was released to the stash-hunting community on September 2, 2000. At the time the site was launched there were 75 known caches in the world.  There are now over 1.5 million caches around the world, in only 12 years.’

This is certainly the condensed version.  Visit Geocaching.com history for the full story.  I checked to see if the Original Cache was still available, but alas, it has been archived and the Un-Original Stash placed in it’s honor.  The links will take you to their listing on Geocaching.com but if you are not logged in I’m not sure if you will be able to view.

When I first moved to Parkdale in ’03 there were only about 20 in the Hood River Valley.  Now there are well over 200, taking you up into the Mt Hood National Forest and the Columbia River Gorge.  Last Sunday we went into the Columbia River Gorge and found 7 in only about 2 hours all the while visiting sites we had yet to explore.  We’ve hosted geocachers here at the Old Parkdale Inn and it is always fun when, at breakfast the next morning, they share their adventures with us.  We have three rooms and we invite you to bring another couple or two and set out on your own geocaching adventure.

I am Mary Pellegrini, owner/innkeeper at the Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast in the Upper Hood River Valley, Oregon.  We are about an hour and a half from Portland, Oregon, a scenic drive through the Columbia River Gorge and the Hood River Valley to our B&B at the base of Oregon’s tallest and majestic Mt Hood.