New Zealand Awaits – Lesbian New Zealand Tour Operator

New Zealand Awaits - New Zealand Lesbian Tour Operator

Periodically we’ll feature one of our tour operators here to let our readers know about some great gay friendly places to stay:

New Zealand Awaits is New Zealand’s LGBT travel specialist proudly taking care of LGBT travellers to New Zealand. As the only New Zealand company offering men’s, women’s, and LGBT small group tours, you know you’ll travel in great company. We also provide private guides for your own group (of 1+), and design itineraries for travellers who want local, expert advice for their self-drive trip.

New Zealand Awaits - New Zealand Lesbian Tour OperatorAs avid global travellers ourselves, we believe that travel can be transformative if it allows for exploration, excitement, awe, and shared connections with both nature and locals. We ensure these elements by connecting you to our trusted locals who are committed to providing authentic, “Kiwi” experiences and who are eager to welcome our LGBT clients. Most of our partners are small, local owner/operators with deep community roots and share our values of sustainability, social responsibility, and exceptional service.

New Zealand is rated one of the gay-friendliest countries by Lonely Planet. Combined with stunning scenery, world class food and wine, unique Maori culture, super-friendly people, and endless activities to choose from, it’s one of the best travel destinations in the world. Let us show you our home. Come home with us!

See the New Zealand Awaits Expanded Listing on Purple Roofs Here

Gay Friendly Bed and Breakfasts, Hotels, and Vacation Rentals in New Zealand

Trans Pride Takes Over Brighton

Trans Pride Brighton

This weekend, Trans Pride took place in Brighton. Now in its fifth year, the event is run by a committee of volunteers.

Take a look below at the amazing march taking over the streets, and the beautiful people in it.

Trans Pride Brighton

Trans Pride Brighton

Many More Photos at Gay Star News

Sussex Gay Travel Resources

New Map of New York City’s Historic Queer Sites

New York City Queer History

The NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project has produced an interactive map featuring their work to exhaustively identify and document sites in New York City pivotal to LGBT history. The project’s founders, Andrew Dolkart, Ken Lustbader, and Jay Shockley, have spent 25 years in research and advocacy and sought to contextualize events and places that had an impact on LGBT lives and progress.

Including sites such as Christine Jorgensen‘s childhood home to Julio Rivera Corner to pre-Stonewall activist gathering spaces, the Project officially began in August 2015 and actively seeks input from members of the community for suggestions and feedback. They described their mission to local NYC site DNAInfo:

Of the 92,000 sites on the National Register of Historic Places, about a dozen are listed for their association with LGBT history.

The historic sites project hopes to change that.

Full Story at Towleroad.com

Planning a Safe Trip as a Queer Traveler

airplane - pixabay Andy Hicks, owner of HIX Inc., a small health care technology consulting business in Denver, travels frequently. And as a gay man, he said, he’s enjoyed acceptance in many destinations — even in Cuba, where he traveled this year with his partner. “We didn’t know what to expect,” Mr. Hicks said. “We had zero problems.” The travel industry offers gay travelers everything from special cruises and tours to gay-friendly hotels. But there are still many places in the world, including many countries in the Middle East, Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and the Pacific, as well as Russia, where laws or social customs create an unwelcoming and unsafe environment for travelers who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender. More than 75 countries consider consensual same-sex sexual relations a crime, and in about 10 countries a person could be put to death for being gay, according to the United States State Department. “Today, it is important for a L.G.B.T. person to understand the laws and how they are enforced and the culture of the countries and even cities where they visit,” said Bruce McIndoe, chief executive of iJet International, a travel risk management company. In an environment of religious extremism, he said, “individuals are more likely to lash out or take unilateral action against assumed members of the L.G.B.T. community.” IJet, he said, has seen increased requests from clients to help prepare and protect their gay and transgender travelers after the mass shooting at an Orlando, Fla., nightclub last June and other episodes.

By Tanya Mohn – Full Story at The New York Times

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