Eating Out: Halifax, Nova Scotia

Brooklyn-Warehouse_byKelsyChauvin The best part of the “eat local” trend is discovering a city with incredible regional ingredients. In Halifax, Nova Scotia, diners enjoy an embarrassment of riches, thanks to the region’s especially fertile and productive growing season, and the bold restaurateurs who take full advantage of Atlantic Canada’s best. In this island province, seafood is of course the star attraction. It’s often so fresh that your fish, lobster, oyster, or other marine delicacy may have been pulled from the bay just hours before. Local chefs complement their prized seafood with well-suited herbs, vegetables, grains, as well as wines and craft brews unique to Nova Scotia. They also excel at making old-favorite dishes their own. Who knew there could be so many delicious versions of poutine or chowder? Gay-friendly Halifax enthusiastically celebrates its Pride every July, but the rest of the year this midsize city is awash in its pride of food sourced from farms, fisheries, foragers, and small-batch producers. While you’re here, you’ll happily devour some of the tastiest food and creatively prepared dishes that we had the pleasure of experiencing during a recent visit.

By Kelsy Chauvin – Full Story at Passport

Nova Scotia Gay Travel Resources

]]>

The Best Sushi in Tokyo – Nomadic Boys

Sushi in Tokyo When you first think of Japanese cuisine, sushi is probably the first thing that comes to mind. Tokyo is one of the best places in the world for an intense sushi #foodporn experience, mainly as a result of having the world’s largest fish market. We set out to discover some of the places to enjoy the best sushi in Tokyo and also stumbled on a few more obscure discoveries. WHAT IS SUSHI? Sushi is raw fish, sliced into small pieces and served on cooked vinegared rice. When it’s served without the rice it’s called sashimi. Sushi literally means, sour tasting in Japanese and comes from the old tradition of preserving raw fish by fermenting it by wrapping it in soured fermenting rice. The fish proteins are then broken down via the fermentation. WHERE TO EAT THE BEST SUSHI IN TOKYO? – THE TSUKIJI FISH MARKET! Tsukiji is famous for being the largest fish market in the world. Daily auctions start from 4am, drawing huge crowds. This is serious fish business. The most expensive fish (222kg of bluefin tuna) was sold here for $1.8m (155.4 million yen) on 5 January 2013.

By Stefan Arestis – Full Story at the Nomadic Boys

]]>

Slurping Noodles in Japan – Nomadic Boys

Stefan Arestis - Nomadic Boys Japan is the place to come for some of the tastiest food on the planet, particularly noodles. Whether it’s the rich dreamy broth based ramen or the juicy thick yummy udon, Japanese noodles are sure to rock your world. But when it comes to eating said noodles, what better way to show your appreciation then with several beautifully timed, loud SLURPS!? You read right. In Japan, slurping is considered good manners and a sign you’re enjoying your meal. Just take care of the splash back on your clothes…! So, should I slurp my noodles in Japan? Absolutely – and with plenty of gusto and pride.

By Stefan Arestis – Full Story at the Nomadic Boys

]]>

TRAVELING IN OUR FABULOUS GAY WORLD – Melvyn's Restaurant, Palm Springs

melvyn's to use outside When we travel from coast to coast we usually do not know where to dine to have a memorable dining experience. Once we find a fabulous place, we go back again and again and again. We have been traveling to Palm Springs, California for 15 years and from the first time we went there we found one of our favorite restaurants in the entire country. Melvyn’s Restaurant which is located in the Ingleside Inn in downtown Palm Springs. We first heard about the restaurant on the television program, “Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous”. melvyns to use interiorWe knew that we had to try it out which we did 15 years ago and since then we have been back dozens of times. Mel Haber, the owner is a tremendously good looking gentleman and has owned the restaurant for 41 years. The decor and menu has not changed in all those years. If something is perfect, then why change it? It is like stepping back in 1950 and 1960’s Hollywood ! Large photos of Sinatra, Elizabeth Taylor and all of the glorious Movie stars from the past are on the walls. Usually while we are dining there, we always see a celebrity or two. Brian Ellis, the Maitre d’ has been there since day one. He has won numerous awards as being one of the finest Maitre d’s in the country. He knows how to do things right and to make every guest have a most memorable dining experience. He has made friends with many of his thousands of diners including us. Travelers to Palm Springs always return again and again to Melvyn’s. Owner Mel Haber is one of the nicest gentleman that we have ever met. He has contributed back to the community in so many ways. He has written two books on his personal experiences in operating his Inn and restaurant. He is a celebrity in his own right and has a Golden Palm Star on the Palm Springs Walk of Stars. mel haberMelvyn’s Restaurant is located in the Ingleside Inn which Mel has also owned for 41 years. Over the years, the Inn has become a magnet for Hollywood’s elite, U.S. Presidents, royalty, aristocrats, captains of industry and celebrities visiting Palm Springs. According to Wikipedia, his guests have included Frank Sinatra, Bob Hope, Lucille Ball, Marlon Brando, Arnold Schwarzenegger and Marie Shriver, Sylvester Stallone, Liza Minnelli, Liberace, Jerry Lewis, Barry Manilow, Kurt Russell, Goldie Hawn, Rita Hayworth, Pat Boone, Debbie Reynolds, Larry King, John Travolta, Sidney Sheldon, David Hasselhoff, President Gerald Ford, George Hamilton and celebrity travel columnists, Donald Pile and Ray Williams and dozens and dozens of other celebrities. Check out Melvyn’s Restaurant at www.inglesideinn.com. They are located at 200 West Ramon Road. Their phone number is 800-772-6655 and the direct number to the restaurant is 760-325.2323. For those readers who have never been to Palm Springs or are not going to be there in the immediate future, Mel Haber has given us one of his favorite recipes to share with our readers that he has on the menu. VEAL INGLESIDE – for Two people- 3 ounces of veal cutlet pounded until thin. Put in pan 2 ounces of peanut oil until hot. Flip both sides of veal into flour until lightly dusted. Whip one egg in a bowl, dip veal into egg batter, saute veal on each side 20 seconds until light brown. Remove veal from pan and throw oil out. Put veal back into the same pan. Use 2 ounces of sherry wine. Reduce for 1 minute. Add 2 ounces of demi-glaze. Cut 1/4 of an avocado fanned and put on top of veal. Cover with 2 ounces of mousseline sauce. Mousseline sauce is made with 8 ounces of heavy whipped cream combined with 4 ounces of hollandaise sauce (all whipped together). Preparation time: 6 minutes. ENJOY ! Don and RayAlways remember to have fun when traveling, meet new people and talk to everyone! TRAVELING IN OUR FABULOUS GAY WORLD is written by Donald Pile and Ray Williams, Award-winning, Celebrity travel columnists who write for gay publications from coast to coast (And now legally married). Proud members of the IGLTA. You can email them at [email protected] and visit their website at http://gaytravelersataol.blogspot.com/

Las Vegas Gay Travel Resources
]]>

Eating in Italy – Dolly Travels

pasta pastaPasta is the queen. As we were walking through our neighborhood the other night, we came upon this display in a kitchen store. I love it! Obviously, her hair is spaghetti, her skirt is made of penne pasta, the belt is coils of angel hair pasta, and her bracelet is red chili peppers. In Italy, every region has their own pasta specialty. I found the one constant spice is red chili flakes or red chili pepper pods. Garlic, of course, is a frequent ingredient in pasta dishes, but it is not in every dish. Some pasta sauces are so delicate that garlic would overwhelm the flavor. Other bolder dishes demand many cloves of this pungent ingredient. I started asking different local people about a particular pasta dish that is ubiquitous in Rome, a simple pasta sauce called Amatriciana. Sometimes that is spelled with 2 m’s. The spelling of the word was only the beginning of the controversy surrounding this sauce. The first controversy I encountered was the origin of the dish. While Roman restaurants say that this is a Roman specialty, the dish actually originated in the town of Amatrici, in northern Lazio area, Lazio is the region that includes Rome, but Amatrici is a small city in central Italy in the Appenines mountain range. People of Amatrici do not take kindly to Romans referring to this as a “Roman specialty. Then I found more controversies. Really, now, would we fight over whether to use garlic, onion, or leave them out or will we become angry If the chef tops the pasta with Parmigiano cheese versus Pecorino? Apparently, Amatricians would. I became very careful, after that, about asking questions concerning specialties. I did find, however, that almost every Italian will be willing to beat me about the head and shoulders if I mentioned Alfredo sauce. “Non Italiano”, was the universal reply, usually accompanied by a sneer and a glare. Alfredo sauce was apparently a culinary creation of a Roman chef, named Alfredo, naturally, created by him to impress some Hollywood movie stars many years ago, Douglas Fairbanks and Mary Pickford. These two enjoyed the dish so much that they presented Chef Alfredo with a golden fork and spoon. The closest one can get to having Alfredo sauce in Italy is pasta carbonara, spaghetti mixed with diced pancetta, raw egg beaten into the sauce , then lots of Parmigiano Reggiano cheese mixed into the pasta. When we were in Sorrento, seafood ruled the menu, and rightfully so. At Ristorante Delfino, I had a pasta called calamarata, as it looks like calamari rings, with shrimp, clams, zucchini, cherry tomatoes in a slightly spicy clear sauce. Frank was enjoying spaghetti alla vongole, spaghetti with clams. All sorts of seafood abound on the menus on the coast. They are so delicious, so fresh, right from the sea, and prepared by a talented chef. Antonio, at Delfino’s, is one of the best chefs in this area. Today, we are in Florence, encountering an unsuspected rainy day, so Chef Dolly decided it was a good day to make soup. I have made many meals in this kitchen over the years, and I am in heaven having the opportunity to cook here once again. One of the things I love about shopping for food here is that I can go to the supermarket, go to the produce department, pick up a packet of soup mix. This container will have 2 carrots, 3 or 4 stalks of celery, one or 2 small onions and some parsley, for a cost of about [euro]1. That is the starter for my soup. I then add some chicken, fennel, zucchini. At the end, I add tortellini. Now I have a marvelous soup, a perfect lunch dish for a rainy afternoon. While we waited for the soup to finish cooking, we had a little appetizer. Frank had gone to the store, brought home a fresh baquette, still warm from the oven, and a bottle of Chianti. We had cheese, prosciutto and olives to round out the aperitivo. (An aside here: the Chianti was on sale for [euro]6. The bread cost less than [euro]1. Good wine and bread are so inexpensive here. Right now, the currency exchange rate is $1 = [euro]. 90. [euro]6 was about $6.60 ) In a future blog post, I will continue with foods of the different regions, as well as the many controversies over food preparation. Italians are very food oriented and proud of their regional specialties, so I must be sure to get my facts straight. I will try to do that as I eat my way through Italy. Ciao for now, Dolly

By Dolly Goolsby – Full Story at Dolly Travels

Italy Gay Travel Resources

]]>

Out in Montreal

Mile-X-Chef-Gregory-Paul-2-CREDIT-Jeff-Heilman Last summer, Montreal’s Gay Village offered its customary seasonal flourish with the return of “Le Projet de Boules Roses,” artist Claude Cromier’s annual stringing of “Pink Balls” above a kilometer-plus long stretch of Sainte-Catherine Street. Part of the annual May to September Aires Libres public art event, the installation featured 200,000 balls this year, up from 170,000. With Sainte-Catherine Street closed to vehicular traffic between Saint- Hubert to Papineau, the enhanced pink canopy provided its usual ambassadorial welcome to the summer surge of gay tourists enjoying the Village’s clubs, outdoor patios, restaurants, bars, shops, and other establishments. According to Community Marketing Inc.’s 2014 LGBT Tourism & Hospitality Survey, Montreal is an equal favorite alongside Toronto and Vancouver for gay travelers from the US, with Canada heading the list of preferred international destinations. All would seem swell in the heart of one of the world’s most popular LGBT tourism destinations, n’est-ce pas? Well, not completely. As publicized earlier this year by the Montreal Gazette, the Village has been experiencing off-season blues for some time. In keeping with the general trend of these technological times, the Internet is reportedly to blame, as Montreal’s younger gay crowd steers toward mobile dating applications instead of hitting the Village’s bars and clubs. As I learned from renowned Montreal journalist Richard “Bugs” Burnett, however, there is more to the story.

By Jeff Heilman – Full Story at Passport

Quebec Gay Travel Resources

]]>

Eating Out: Dallas

Stampede 66 Dallas is proud of some of its stereotypes. The “Big D” is, after all, where you’d head to find big hats and big cowboys wearing them, most of them sporting big appetites to boot. Then there’s football, another Big D, the silver-starred Cowboys. Even the classic TV show Dallas is something locals are proud to call their own, and not just for the big hats and big hair that made it the ultimate, iconic melodrama of the 1980s. On the other hand, there are quite a few Dallas clichés ready to get bucked. Top among them is that this city is too conservative to have much LGBT culture. On a recent visit to Oak Lawn, one of the state’s, and perhaps all of the South’s, busiest gay neighborhoods, it was plain to see that queer folks are also pretty big in Dallas. Of course, where there’s a vibrant gay community there tends to be a strong dining scene. In Dallas, that’s true both in the gayborhood and around town. From staples like Tex-Mex and barbecue, to spicy send-ups and restaurants with soul, it’s time to refresh our notions about what Dallas has cooking. LOCKHART SMOKEHOUSE Vegetarians beware: This may not be the restaurant for you. The first tipoff are staff T- shirts that read, simply, “Wood fire meat beer.” The second is a menu that lists chick- en and turkey under “TX Vegetarian.” But for those who appreciate barbecued brisket, ribs, and other carnivorous delights, Lockhart Smokehouse delivers. This family operation is a relative newcomer having opened in the cute, walkable Bishop Arts District in 2011. Today it upholds the standard for central-Texas-style smoked meats and is considered by many to be one of the best places for barbecue nationwide.

By Kelsey Chauvin – Full Story at Passport

Dallas Gay Travel Resources

Other Gay Travel Events

]]>

Eating Out: Melbourne

visionsofvictoria1448980-833 Sydney may have the iconic Opera house, Mardi Gras glitz, and some celebrity chefs, yet Melbourne can lay claim to Australia’s only inclusion on the World’s 50 Best Restaurants In the World list–Chef Ben Shewry’s avant-garde, farm-to-table hotspot Attica. Melbourne also has the honor of being a repeat title holder of World’s Most Livable City. The dining scene here is simply incredible, thanks in no small part to the bounty of produce and wines resulting from the Victoria region’s climate (“four seasons in a day,” locals like to say), a burgeoning crop of under-the-radar innovative chefs, a teeming craft coffee culture, and strong multi-cultural influences. From Melbourne’s downtown (CBD) and its famed, labyrinthine laneways to hipster hoods Fitzroy and Collingwood, amazing new spots are cropping up everywhere. Openings and reboots are routinely chronicled on chic “what’s on” website, Broadsheet, while annual tome The Age Good Food Guide keeps tabs on the best and brightest. A tastings-filled food tour is always a good idea, and the excellent and sassy Monique Bayer’s Walk Melbourne offers superb 3-hour expeditions covering coffee, chocolate, dumplings, rooftop bars, and more from $53-up. You can even try some modern Aussie cuisine from New York or Los Angeles in Qantas’ business class where the menus are by Neil Perry, whose high-profile Rockpool can be found at Melbourne’s Crown casino complex.

By Lawrence Ferber – Full Story at Passport Magazine

Victoria Gay Travel Resources

]]>

Ten Favorite Traditional Foods of Japan – Nomadic Boys

Gyoza-Stefan-Kyoto Japanese food is hands down one of the best in the world. Even Sebastien, a very proud Frenchman admitted it was his favourite. But don’t just take our word for it: in December 2013, the Japanese cuisine (called washoko), was added to UNESCO’s list of intangible heritage list. Which other cuisines do you know are UNESCO listed?!! (Sebastien was quick to point out the French cuisine is also in the same UNESCO list). Proud Frenchman aside, after finding a great deal on Skyscanner, we decided to go to Japan for 2 weeks and visited Tokyo, Takayama, Kyoto, Hiroshima and Okinawa. So, get ready for some serious foodporn in our run down of our 10 favourite traditional food of Japan.

By Stefan Arestis – Full Story at the Nomadic Boys

]]>

Eating Out: Dallas

Cuarto-Privado-2 Dallas is proud of some of its stereotypes. The “Big D” is, after all, where you’d head to find big hats and big cowboys wearing them, most of them sporting big appetites to boot. Then there’s football, another Big D, the silver-starred Cowboys. Even the classic TV show Dallas is something locals are proud to call their own, and not just for the big hats and big hair that made it the ultimate, iconic melodrama of the 1980s. On the other hand, there are quite a few Dallas cliches ready to get bucked. Top among them is that this city is too conservative to have much LGBT culture. On a recent visit to Oak Lawn, one of the state’s, and perhaps all of the South’s, busiest gay neighborhoods, it was plain to see that queer folks are also pretty big in Dallas. Of course, where there’s a vibrant gay community there tends to be a strong dining scene. In Dallas, that’s true both in the gayborhood and around town. From staples like Tex-Mex and barbecue, to spicy send-ups and restaurants with soul, it’s time to refresh our notions about what Dallas has cooking. LOCKHART SMOKEHOUSE Vegetarians beware: This may not be the restaurant for you. The first tipoff are staff T- shirts that read, simply, “Wood fire meat beer.” The second is a menu that lists chick- en and turkey under “TX Vegetarian.”

By Kelsy Chauvin – Full Story at Passport Magazine

Dallas Gay Travel Resources

]]>