Travel Guide to Gay Mongolia – The Nomadic Boys

Gay Mongolia

When asked which is our favorite place in the world we’ve been to, Mongolia is one place we both agree is truly remarkable!

We visited gay Mongolia after our Trans Siberian railway adventure and ended up staying for a month. We didn’t expect to, but the landscapes in the Gobi Desert and the nomadic life along the Mongolian steppe just blew our minds. We loved it! Yes, it’s roughing it slightly as luxuries are scarce out here, but this is one cultural adventure you won’t forget in a hurry.

When it comes to gay travel, it’s fair to say that Mongolia is not the #1 place that comes to mind! This is a far cry from the Circuit parties of Barcelona or the wild scene of Fort Lauderdale. This country is more of a place to come to be awed by nature; a photographer’s paradise!

However, we still think it’s a place other gay travelers should experience. In this gay guide to Mongolia, we’ve sumarised our travels through the lands of Genghis Khan, which we hope inspires you to also pay this magnificent country a visit.

Rights in Gay Mongolia

LGBTQ+ rights in the country are, well, more advanced than you’d expect. When compared to the rest of the continent, Mongolia is one of the more advanced queer friendly nations in Asia. The government repealed its anti-gay law back in 1993, introduced the right to change legal gender in 2009, and also passed hate crime laws to protect its LGBTQ community in 2017.

Full Story at The Nomadic Boys

Mongolia Gay Travel Resources

Exploring Washington State’s Olympic National Park

Olympic National Park - Provided by Maitland Manor

Olympic National Park on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula is an adventure that deserves a spot on your travel short list. It’s regularly named among the top national parks in the world by travel writers, explorers, and experts. Travel+Leisure magazine readers voted it one of the Top 15 National Parks in the United States. It’s the perfect place for LGBTQ travelers looking for an escape that’s easy to get to, welcoming, and accessible for people of all abilities, but still feels like a world class passport to a million acres of unspoiled wilderness.

Olympic National Park comprises the  bulk the Olympic Peninsula, about 2 hours drive Northwest from SeaTac Airport and the city of Seattle, making it a prime location to visit with easy access. And there’s enough to do here to create an impressive itinerary in and around the park from a single central hub. The Olympic Peninsula includes not only Olympic National Park, but also Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge, Olympic National Forest, and the Olympic National Marine Sanctuary.

Getting Around Olympic National Park

You’ll need a car, as this park is huge, and not easily accessible with public transportation (although there are some options for that). From the airport, the easiest route is driving south along I-5 through Tacoma and heading west on WA-16. If you’re exploring all the wonderful LGBTQ hotspots in Seattle first (like world-famous Capitol Hill and the Broadway Market), then the best way is to take the ferry from downtown Seattle to Bainbridge Island.

Experience the famous Washington ferry system in action. No reservations are needed as the ferry holds 300 cars and leaves about once per hour.

Exploring the Park

Now that you’re out on the Olympic Peninsula, you’ll want to stay about a week to explore everything you can see and do, and take full advantage of the unusual diversity of the Park’s multiple and varied ecosystems. First , unlike most National Parks, Olympic does not have a main gate, and you cannot drive through the Park.

Instead, there are gates dotted around the perimeter of the Park, with access to multiple trailheads at each entry point. The most popular spots are: Hurricane Ridge (alpine mountains), Lake Crescent and Sol Duc Falls (glacial lakes and waterfalls in the rainforest), Hoh Rainforest (location of the quietest square foot in America), and Rialto Beach (wild Pacific Coast). The park is open year-round, but access to some places is limited in winter.

What’s Nearby?

Outside of the National Park, you’ll definitely want to take in the Dungeness Spit (the longest natural sand spit in the Western Hemisphere), Cape Flattery (the northwestern-most point of the contiguous United States), take a day trip by ferry to Victoria B.C., and explore some of the county and state parks that are less visited but no less spectacular.

There are 4 primary towns on the Olympic Peninsula: Port Townsend (a Victorian arts seaport), Sequim (the lavender capital of North America), Forks (of Twilight fame and gateway to the Hoh Rainforest and Rialto Beach), and Port Angeles (the largest town in the area and closest to the most popular places to visit in the area).

Port Angeles is a great location to use as your “home base” during your visit as it’s centrally located to everything the Peninsula and Park have to offer.

Where to Stay

LGBTQ-friendly Maitland Manor is an exceptional boutique B&B in downtown Port Angeles within easy  walking distance of the waterfront, and LGBTQ-owned Domaine Madeleine is an intimate luxury inn located on a waterfront bluff just outside the city.

Maitland Manor:

Domaine Madeleine

Both offer comfortable accommodations, easily accessible locations, all the amenities you need to explore the area, and a welcoming environment for LGBTQ travelers, including couples and solo travelers. Domaine Madeleine also welcomes pets.

Visit Maitland Manor | Visit Domaine Madeline

Each inn provides comprehensive, up-to-date day trip itineraries to ensure you see everything the area has to offer. Depending on the season, you’ll encounter extraordinarily lush green rainforests (March-May and October-November), wildflowers (June-August), wildlife (year-round, but especially September-October), leaf-peeping (late September to early October), solitude and winter sports (November-February), a variety of renowned festivals that vary by season, and romance and adventure year round. Also of note, Port Angeles is home to the longest running and one of the leading annual transgender conferences, Esprit, held in May every year.

Ball Yoga: It’s a Thing! Here’s a Way to Exercise With Your Crown Jewels – Everything To Sea

Now that we’re emerging from a long quarantine, many people are realizing they may have put on a few “pandemic pounds.”  Well, if you find yourself in that category, we’re here to help.  We heard of a new way to exercise…with your balls.  Yes, it’s called “Ball Yoga”. We went to our friends The Naked Trainers to find out what it’s all about, and how you can get to stretching the family jewels.  

The mastermind behind the new “dick-centric movement class for men” is none other than Jason Wimberly, one of the “Naked Trainers”… guys who train… naked. Jason tells us that his class, which he offers online, is the only one around.  It may sound new to you, but he says the practice dates back thousands of years.  

“The fundamentals are rooted in Ancient Chinese Medicine, where the penis is referred to as the ‘Jade Stalk’, and testicles called ‘Dragon Pearls’,” he explains. “It was believed that an increase of intention boosts circulation and blood flow, resulting in an increase in male vitality and testosterone production. It also feels fucking cool. I’ve made it into a fun group class that involves some classic yoga stretches, breathwork, some core training, ball stretching, and lots of dick swinging.” We like the sound of that! 

One of Jason’s mantras is “Movement is medicine, and nudity is healing”. It is one of his core beliefs and one of the big reasons why he trains in the nude. How does the class work?  It takes the basics of yoga (stretching and breathing) and incorporates being naked, and some “ball work.”  

“Nudity is about freedom, not just from clothes but from shaming thoughts or programmed ideas. Shame is not a natural emotion, it’s a learned behavior. My mission is to stop that shit,” Jason said.

Read more at Everything To Sea.

Everything To Sea runs all-male, clothing-optional trips on traditional wooden yachts in the calm seas of Indonesia. As a travel operator, they specialize in excursions for men of all orientations, that center around freedom, camaraderie, and friendship. 

Since January 2019, Everything To Sea has been exploring natural environments and giving guys one-of-a-kind, life-changing experiences. Trips range from private journeys for individuals to small-group departures for up to 12 men. Their ships are also available for existing men’s groups, such as yoga or tantric communities, who are seeking unforgettable journeys.

Olympic National Park’s Ruby Beach – 2TravelDads

Olympic National Park's Ruby Beach - 2TravelDads

Does anybody think of Washington State as a beach destination? Not hardly, but that doesn’t mean that we don’t have the most beautiful ones around. True, Olympic National Park is missing the palm trees, but we make up for it in other ways. Of all of the sandy shorelines in the Pacific Northwest, the most beautiful one in Washington is without a doubt Ruby Beach in Olympic National Park.

What makes Ruby Beach so beautiful and dramatic? It’s the sea stacks, the weathered wood, the wildlife, the perfection of it all. We’ve got the scoop for how and when to visit to have an unforgettable time at the most beautiful beach in Washington. And if you’re lucky, maybe you’ll find some of the red rocks and garnets that give Ruby Beach its name.

How to Get to Ruby Beach in Olympic National Park

One of the things that makes the most beautiful in Washington is its remote location. Located just over three hours from Seattle and a little more than 2 hours from Olympia, it’s not exactly an impromptu day trip, which keeps the crowds down. If you’re making the trek that far you should plan on spending a few days both on the sand and in the Hoh Rainforest nearby.

Full Story at 2TravelDads

Olympic Peninsula Gay Travel Resources

Manuel Antonio Gay Beaches – The Globetrotter Guys

Manuel Antonio Gay Beaches - The Globetrotter Guys

Manuel Antonio is one of the most popular LGBTQ+ destinations in Costa Rica so it should come as no surprise that there are a fair number of Manuel Antonio gay beaches.

In fact, this stretch of the Pacific coast has been said to have some of the best beaches in the world boasting clear warm waters and long stretches of sand.

In this mini guide we will share 3 gay beaches in the area, including (of course) a nude beach. So grab you best speedos and let’s take a look!

Best Manuel Antonio Gay Beaches

The main and most popular beach is Playa Espadilla. The south end of the beach meets the edge of the most visited national park in Costa Rica, the beautiful national park. At this end of the beach, you with find plenty of shops, restaurants and many other tourists.

Full Story at The Globetrotter Guys

Manuel Antonio Gay Travel Resources

The Grand Resort and Spa – Fort Lauderdale Gay Resort

The Grand Resort and Spa - Fort Lauderdale Gay Resort

Fort Lauderdale Gay Resort and Spa – Gay Owned

Welcome to Fort Lauderdale’s Grand Resort and Spa, a Southern Florida vacation getaway just steps from the beach and the Atlantic Ocean.

Our Fort Lauderdale gay resort has a 5 building campus with thirty-three well-appointed rooms and suites, an on-site day spa, The Club Room, fitness center, an ocean-view sundeck, and our clothing optional tropical courtyard with hot tub for relaxing and meeting other guests. There’s a large heated turquoise pool, as well as beach chairs and umbrellas for your use. And we offer beer, wine and champagne service.

Our amenities include:

* No Extra Fees
* Free WiFi
* Parking
* Continental / Hot Breakfast Daily (Available while supplies last.
* Free Happy Hour Thurs, Fri and Sat
* Complimentary Mimosas Sun
* Complimentary Beach Bags
* Complimentary Joseph Abboud Bath Products.
* Coin-op Washers and Dryers
* Barbecue Grill

Looking for a friendly Fort Lauderdale getaway? Come spend the weekend – or week – with us!

See the Grand Resort and Spa Expanded Listing on Purple Roofs Here

Fort Lauderdale Gay Resorts, Bed and Breakfasts, Hotels, and Vacation Rentals

A Personal Experience: Being Gay in Indonesia – Everything To Sea

Ernest Hemingway once wrote, “Any man’s life, told truly, is a novel…” We are thrilled to publish a personal story from the heart. A journey of being gay in Indonesia, from Everything To Sea’s Support Specialist, Ron.

What’s it like to be gay here? For a lot of people who have never been to Indonesia and only hear news from the internet, this sounds like not a good place to live for gay people. Although a single province at the northwest tip of the country called Aceh practices Sharia law, and some gay accommodations were recently closed by a local authority in Bali, things are not as bad as they sound in the media. While it’s hard to call Indonesia gay-friendly (there is no legal representation for LGBTQIA+ folks, and being “out” is rare), it can be considered a gay-tolerant country – and the island of Bali is more so.

Thinking about my life as an Indonesian gay man living in Bali, I feel like I have more freedom to express my gay side, compared to others who live outside the island. I can go to gay bars, and I can openly socialize with gay friends. Although I’m not completely out – some people whom I work with know that I am gay, some don’t – I feel like I don’t have to announce it to everybody. There was a time I wasn’t comfortable saying that I’m gay – even to myself. Now I know who I am, but the journey has been a long road.

Looking back at the time when I first discovered myself as a gay man, I was about 20 years old and had just graduated from university. It was a true revelation. Being born and raised in a rural area in East Java, I was taught to be subtle, humble, and respectful to others. We were not supposed to talk about sex or sexual desires. Now, I have always been polite, curious, and striving for the best. These values were strictly taught to me by my father, while my mother was more relaxed, and gave me greater space to make my own decisions. As a high school student, I was attracted to a girl, and fell in love with her – but I knew in the back of my mind that I was actually excited by the thought of being with men. Driven by a big curiosity over several months, I telephoned a prominent gay professor in the town of Surabaya. He invited me to a bi-monthly gathering for gay men. It was quite nerve-wracking as it was my first time, but the LGBTQIA+ people there were very friendly and welcomed me with wide-open arms.

I didn’t fully embrace myself as a gay man until I met my first boyfriend, a very intelligent gentleman from the USA, who taught me to think and question. In this way, my brain was stimulated.  It wasn’t an easy process, because questioning is against Indonesian cultural values. We had a lot of conflicts in the beginning over small issues, but somehow we made it through. We traveled together in Indonesia, taking trains and airplanes. It didn’t bother us what people thought – even when we’d check into accommodations and request a king-size bed.  I remember there was a time when we traveled by train and were near a group of younger Indonesians in their thirties. From the way they looked at us, the men and women smiled. They seemed to know we were a gay couple, and I felt very comfortable.

And yet being gay in Indonesia, there are still challenges that I currently face. When they surface, they are from family – and society in general. The family issue is that I would be happy to come out as a gay man, yet I’m not sure how my mother, brother, and sister would handle it. I’m sure they would accept me and embrace me, but what I fear is ultimately how sad they would be. Their idea is that it’s not good to be gay, as it’s against their religion: for them, being gay is seen as an unnatural choice against God, and ultimately a sin. Surely there would be a period of shock. And then there’s the cultural thing: my mother would later share the news with those around her. Although neighbors wouldn’t hate her or hate the rest of my family, they’d certainly talk about us amongst themselves. And I’m not sure my mother would be able to handle the ensuing pressure.

I guess the policy “don’t ask/don’t tell” works very well here. Also, Indonesians – straight or gay – don’t display affection in public. So although I say I have more freedom living in Bali instead of Java or any other Indonesian island, there are still cultural challenges that exist throughout the nation. Indonesians in general still have negative attitudes towards the literal gay sex act. We still don’t have legalized gay marriage, but the younger generation here is definitely more accepting of the LGBTQIA+ population. In the end, I sincerely hope time will be the agent for change. 

By Ron Roeslan, Support Specialist, Everything To Sea

Check out more stories at Everything To Sea.

Everything To Sea runs all-male, clothing-optional trips on traditional wooden yachts in the calm seas of Indonesia. As a travel operator, they specialize in excursions for men of all orientations, that center around freedom, camaraderie, and friendship. 

Since January 2019, Everything To Sea has been exploring natural environments and giving guys one-of-a-kind, life-changing experiences. Trips range from private journeys for individuals to small-group departures for up to 12 men. Their ships are also available for existing men’s groups, such as yoga or tantric communities, who are seeking unforgettable journeys.

Fauna in Flores – Everything To Sea

The fauna in Flores varies from the Komodo dragons to wild boars and deer, to Manta Rays swimming in the Coral Triangle. And the Wallace Line, which scientifically delineates species, is an altogether different aspect of this region.

The relatively dry and rocky Lesser Sunda’s are not home to impressive rainforests or a big diversity in strange local animals. In fact, these islands are kind of low populated with big animals. Areas that are covered in shrubs are the habitat of deer, wild pigs, bats, snakes, dragons, and other lizards.

Underwater Wonderland

It’s a totally different view of the underwater world. The coral reefs there (known as the Coral Triangle) belong to the richest ecosystems in the world. Nowhere else can you find a more diverse variety of aquatic species. One single big reef in Nusa Tenggara can contain about 1000 species of fish, more than in all seas in Europe combined. The underwater world is very colorful. Brave anemone fish defend their living house against the teasing hand of the diver. Groups of coral butterflyfish float between the reef walls and other fish cross the reef in couples. The area houses big sea mammals like the sperm whale and the Indian sea cow, which looks like walrus without teeth. Along the border of the reefs, you can find big pelagic fish: peaceful whale and reef sharks, and manta’s, which are relatives of the ray fish.

The Komodo Dragon

The most impressive animal of Nusa Tenggara is the Komodo Dragon (Varanus komodoensis), the biggest living lizard in the world, which belongs to Komodo, Rinca, and Western Flores. This robust animal can reach 3 meters in length and weigh up to 150 kg. The heavyweight was only known in the Western world by the start of the 20th century, mainly because Komodo then became inhabited. Shortly thereafter, stories about dangerous, seven-meter-long crocodiles started to emerge. The stories were somewhat exaggerated, however, these lizards can certainly scare people. The giant lizard has a physique that looks like a snake. Its jaws can move independently from each other, so it can swallow an entire prey larger than its mouth. And its forked tongue is used for smelling as well as for tasting.

Indeed, the Komodo Dragon is one of the best-equipped predators: it has a powerful tail to take down its prey, and strong jaws with sharp teeth to tear the victim apart. But its saliva and stomach juices are what kills its prey, and ultimately decay horns, bones, and hair.

Wallace Line

Zoologist Alfred Russel Wallace, who toured Indonesia from 1854 until 1862, was the first to remark that the size of big land animals changed drastically when crossing the sea lane from Bali to Lombok. From Lombok, there were no elephants, rhinos, or tigers anymore; in fact, he didn’t see any meat-eating mammals excepting one species of a cat, nor any insect eaters.

Wallace remarked that when he went more to the east, he found lesser Asian species and more Australian species. He concluded that the border between the two groups, the two small islands – Bali and Lombok – were as big as the differences between South America and Africa, or between North America and Europe. Still, nothing on the map indicated a barrier as large as the Atlantic Ocean.

Back in London, Wallace reported his findings to the National Geographic Society in 1863. There, he drew a straight red line on the map of the Malay archipelago, with Borneo and Bali on one side, and Lombok and Sulawesi on the other. This line was later named the ‘Wallace Line’.

The zoologist was convinced that there was an actual barrier. At the peak of the last Ice Age, the sea level dropped 180 meters, so it would have been possible to walk from Singapore to Bali, but no further to the east.  The deep Lombok Strait formed an impassable barrier.

Full Story at Everything To Sea.

Everything To Sea runs all-male, clothing-optional trips on traditional wooden yachts in the calm seas of Indonesia. As a travel operator, they specialize in excursions for men of all orientations, that center around freedom, camaraderie, and friendship. 

Since January 2019, Everything To Sea has been exploring natural environments and giving guys one-of-a-kind, life-changing experiences. Trips range from private journeys for individuals to small-group departures for up to 12 men. Their ships are also available for existing men’s groups, such as yoga or tantric communities, who are seeking unforgettable journeys.

Our 10 Favorite New York Gay Bars – Nomadic Boys

Our 10 Favorite New York Gay Bars - Nomadic Boys

Whether you’re a first-time visitor or a seasoned scene queen, here’s our roundup of the top gay bars in New York City to check out now! Everyone knows that the New York City gay bar scene is nothing short of vibrant and the city’s nightlife is unquestionably busy.

New York is also one of the gayest cities in the United States! The problem is that sometimes it can feel overwhelming, especially if it’s your first time visiting the city. It can feel like there is too much to do and not enough time… where do you even start?

Here is a list of the top New York gay bars, whether you’re a first-time visitor or a seasoned scene queen ! And the best part… most of them are on the west side either in the West Village, Chelsea or Hell’s Kitchen, so really, depending on how long you are in the city, you can bar hop and visit most, if not all of them!

New York Gay Bars – The Stonewall Inn

This NYC landmark is where the modern LGBTQ+ rights movement started in 1969. Popular with tourists and locals alike, it’s no surprise that the crowd varies in age, gender, and geography. You’ll meet people from everywhere in this bar.

Full Story at the Nomadic Boys

New York Gay Travel Resources

Is Your Mind Keeping Your Body From Getting Naked? – Everything To Sea

“I don’t have a good enough body to be naked in front of others.” Have you ever said this before? Even if you haven’t said it out loud, perhaps you’ve thought it to yourself. We interviewed a guy who’s posted on our Twitter page. Below, he talks about his own body image...

The term “body positivity” has become more popular lately, mainly because of the fact that social media has pushed perfect physiques, huge dicks, and chiseled faces on our screens, on a daily basis. What does that do for a man’s self-esteem? It makes some guys want to hide any curves they have, and keep their clothes on.

One of our Twitter followers at Everything2SeaX caught our attention. After we reached out to him, he agreed to speak candidly with our blog readers.

His main mission is to promote body positivity. He hopes nudity becomes more normalized in society and people gain comfort with their naked selves.

Simon Manna, 23, is from Italy. While he currently identifies as bisexual, Manna says he continues to explore his sexuality. He says that the media has made nudity more about perfection, rather than accepting everybody as beautiful. “I think that it is necessary to desexualize our society because a lot of people are not able to separate the view of a naked body from pornography and lust.”

Even though you may look at the photos from his Twitter feed and think, “Wow, he looks pretty perfect to me,” Simon tells us that for him, being comfortable when naked has been a process. First, he had to overcome society’s condemnation about being nude in public. Then, he had to deal with the idea that his body didn’t live up to what he saw on social media feeds, films, and television.

“I’ve always been fascinated by nudity since I was a teenager, but at that time I was not brave enough to try nudism. Finally, last year, while I was home alone, I decided to try to get naked – and I loved it. The only advice I can give for guys who want to try [getting nude] is to start in a relatively safe place like a nudist resort, or their own house. They don’t have to worry about the size of their penis or the shape of their body because real nudists do not judge other people’s bodies. Just relax and enjoy your naked time. “

“I’ve always been fascinated by nudity since I was a teenager, but at that time I was not brave enough to try nudism. Finally, last year, while I was home alone, I decided to try to get naked – and I loved it. The only advice I can give for guys who want to try [getting nude] is to start in a relatively safe place like a nudist resort, or their own house. They don’t have to worry about the size of their penis or the shape of their body because real nudists do not judge other people’s bodies. Just relax and enjoy your naked time. “

Full Story at Everything To Sea.

Everything To Sea runs all-male, clothing-optional trips on traditional wooden yachts in the calm seas of Indonesia. As a travel operator, they specialize in excursions for men of all orientations, that center around freedom, camaraderie, and friendship. 

Since January 2019, Everything To Sea has been exploring natural environments and giving guys one-of-a-kind, life-changing experiences. Trips range from private journeys for individuals to small-group departures for up to 12 men. Their ships are also available for existing men’s groups, such as yoga or tantric communities, who are seeking unforgettable journeys.