Bologna – Dolly Travels

Author: , October 25th, 2019

Bologna

Good morning, well, buongiorno from Firenze, as it is really early afternoon.

Yes!! Now I am truly back in my second home. However, Susan and I had a delightful 2 days in Bologna. Since we arrived there on Sunday, so many points of interest were closed. We did not want to visit museums, anyway. Bologna is a lovely place to walk.

Most of the streets in Bologna are covered with the arched colonnades (or loggia or arcades: take your pick of the descriptive words). Although we had sunny days, the roofs kept the sun off, but they are also very nice when it rains.

There are many ancient Roman ruins in Bologna. Frank Garcia would be disappointed in me. I did not delve into the history of Romans in Bologna, but those Romans went far afield. I promise, I will look more into this when I am back home again. Sorry, Frank.

Bologna is a food-lover’s city. There are very good restaurants everywhere. Of course, nearby are the fantastic prosciutto farms, the Parmigiana factories and the home of balsamico. Those food are prominent on the menus. Apparently, tortellini are also a prime product of Bologna, as we saw tortellini or tortelli (larger filled pasta) on every menu. All were delicious. It was difficult to choose. I wanted to take a cooking class, but the one I found, the instructor showed how to make the tortellini, but I wanted a hands-on class. I shall have to experiment back home.

Of course, when I came to Mortadella, I had to stop. Look at all the proscuitti and cheeses hanging from the ceiling. On another shelf were bottles and bottles of balsamico, anywhere from recent to over 25 years in age. And the local pastries looked so yummy. People were getting sandwiches that looked so good, too, I finally had to drag myself out of the store. Actually, I think it was Susan who dragged me out, or I might still be there.

Imagine our surprise at walking across a canal. It looked so much like Venice. Just another lovely sight on our walks.

Now we are in Florence, for a couple days. We are staying up near Santa Maria Novella for these 2 days, as it is only a few minutes walk from the train station. It is a nice little neighborhood with cafes, restaurants, hairdressers, grocery stores and pharmacies all within a few blocks.

But you know, I had to go back to our neighborhood, the place I really call home. Susan and I walked down to the Duomo area last night. We walked past Santa Maria Novella church. It is so pretty, with the flowers around the grassy areas.

We walked to the OK Bar. Well, now it is l”OK Osteria. We sat outside and had Aperol Spritzes. I was so pleased to be greeted by the bartender, Massimo and the waiter, Fabrio. They are both long-time friends from my frequent visits to the OK Bar over the past many years.

We walked some more last night, finding our dinner at another favorite restaurant, Il Porscopino (the Porcupine) near San Lorenzo church.

It is good to be back in Florence, my favorite city in all of Italy. Tomorrow, we will go to Cinque Terre for 3 nights, then return to Florence for 10 days.

I have enjoyed every place that we have visited. Susan got to see the historical sights in Padova, but I was content with seeing the city. On this trip, since I have seen the museums before, and I appreciate their greatness, I am more interested in seeing the towns and cities as a local would see them. I love the parks, the little shops, the tiny restaurants with only a few tables, but are packed every night with locals.

In case you have not know this before:

I LOVE ITALY!!!

Stayed tuned for posts from Cinque Terre.
Ciao for now,
Dolly

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Greetings From Italia – Dolly Travels

Author: , October 20th, 2019

Greetings From Italia - Dolly Travels

The first two days we were in Italy, we spent in Venice. Venice is lovely, as always. We were very tired when we finally got to our hotel on Wednesday. We had to spend some time just finding the hotel. Nothing is easy to find in that city, as the streets wind around small canals. We crossed many bridges, and just when we found the street, it came to a dead end. It did take up again on the other side of a small canal. You would think I would be used to getting lost in Venice, as I have done that so many times.

When we finally found the hotel, we put our things in our room and set out to find a good place to have some dinner. We found a small, out of the way ristorante. We enjoyed some pasta with clams, then we went right back to the hotel, as we were very tired.

Imagine our surprise the next morning to be awakened by singing gondoliers. We looked out our window, but we saw only a small piazza. Once we were dressed and went out exploring, we discovered that our hotel (our room) backed up to a gondolier stop.

Full Story at Dolly Travels

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Cinque Terre – Dolly Travels

Author: , September 18th, 2019

I promised I would write about Cinque Terre, the five villages on the Ligurian coast that are part of the Italian Riviera. Susan and I spent three lovely days in Vernazza, the fourth of the five cities. We were so busy having fun, I neglected to write while we were there. Now, as we wait for a train that will take us back to Florence, I find I have time to write.

Susan was much more active that I was. Every morning she got up early and went for a hike to either Monterosso or Cerniglia. I walked around town, which was fun and I got some exercise, too. There is hardly any flat ground in Vernazza. The same holds true for the other 3 villages to the south: Riomaggiore, Manarola and Corniglia. These little towns have buildings seemingly Super Glued to the mountainsides. Walking around any of those little towns gives you plenty of exercise.

In Vernazza, the trail twists and turns before you get to a tower. This particular tower is at the east end of town.

Monterosso, to the north of Vernazza, does have some flat ground, and of course, it has the largest beach. People come from all over to swim in the Ligurian Sea at Monterosso.

Our days were filled with walking, exploring and enjoying the fantastic food of the villages. Since Vernazza is a fishing village, our meals were primarily seafood. I did read the menus carefully, for some seafood delicacies are not items I want to try. I suppose I should be more adventurous in that respect.

Yesterday, I wanted to relax at the beach, so I took the train to Monterosso. I walked down to the Bagno di Stella, where I usually go to swim. I rented a chair and umbrella for the day and spent most of the day right at that spot. The Bagno has a restaurant, so I was able to have lunch without leaving the area.

Finally, after I had enough sun and water, I met Susan at the train station. We went back to Vernazza and we both took long naps. We had to renew our energy for more wonderful eating. Dinner last night was at Gambero Rosso, our favorite restaurant. I had some fish in a red sauce with capers and olives. Susan had fried fish, which looked tasty.

Now we will go to our second home, on Via Dei Servi in Florence. We will stay there for ten days. Perhaps we will have time to find all our old favorite places, visit the OK Bar a time or two. One thing I know for sure, I am going to the “mercato” and I will be cooking many of our meals. I am going through cooking withdrawal.

I cannot leave you without giving you a Vernazza sunset. I do hope you will be able to come here some day and witness a sunset for yourself.

I will post more about Florence later. Stay tuned!!

Ciao for now,
Dolly

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Another Beautiful Day in Puerto Vallarta – Dolly Travels

Author: , April 25th, 2019

Puerto Vallarta - Dolly

Hola!

I know. I did not put the upside-down exclamation point at the beginning, as I should have done. Nevertheless, I want to write another post, and tell you more about this lovely city.

On Saturday, I went downtown to the weekly open market. There were many things to see and do. The market was busy, crowded, for apparently, many of the ex-pat locals get together at the market; I heard English spoken more than Spanish, and I just knew those people were not ordinary tourists, like me.

As so often happens at markets, some of the merchants do not have their own stall… Some have to wear their merchandise on their head.

I did not investigate the vegan taco/hamburger stand. It just did not sound right to me. It must seem right to others, though, for the stand was quite busy.

Later, I walked along the Malecon, starting at the southern end and walked back toward the Centro, near the Cathedral.

It certainly was a day to be in or close to the water.

Back in my own neighborhood, which is at the far northern end of Puerto Vallarta, by the Marina, I found some interesting sights that I probably would not see back home.

First, I saw two different versions of food trucks. I have made a habit of going for an early morning walk every day. This enterprising man was doing a booming business, every day. His customers were locals, I believe.

Yesterday, I left the marina and walked into an older neighborhood just a couple of blocks away. Another food truck was there. The man was a genius. He was standing at the tail gate of his truck. He had a griddle to his left, a pot of beans to his right, and a work station right in front of him. He was cutting up a piece of meat that just came off of some unseen pot, and he was chopping it up for tacos or burritos. He was doing a booming business, with customers coming out of the nearby shops, waiting for their breakfast. I stayed away, but the aroma from that truck certainly was enticing.

Many of the workers on the construction sites and other businesses nearby do not have their own transportation. Hotel workers receive bus fare from the employer, or some, like the Westin, run their own employee vans. Others, as these men below, just get into the back of a pick up truck.

Today, I am going to go back to town, and hopefully, walk the entire length of the Malecon, up and back, for there is just something about that two mile stretch of walkway along the seashore that keeps calling me back.

Then, this afternoon, I will relax under a palapa, sip a refreshing tropical drink, and end another happy day.

My goal for the afternoon…relaxing on the beach.

I will say, “Adios” for now. I will be back soon.

Dolly

San Sebastián del Oeste – Dolly Travels

Author: , April 17th, 2019

San Sebastián del Oeste

!Hola!

I think I am finally getting the hang of this Spanish language. I know how to ask for someone to fix the sink. I can order food and drink, get a taxi…hmm. That is about it. An older man, a helper at Walmart, asked me today why I didn’t speak Spanish. I told him I was working on it, but he shook his head and declared I should have done that years ago. I don’t know why he felt that way, but I told him I would keep trying, but he shook his head again, as if to declare me hopeless. Oh, well. My new phrase today, direct from my language translator, is: ¿Alquiera en busca una cerveza? Is anyone up for a beer?

Today is a lovely day: a bit breezy, but the sun is shining, and all is well in Puerto Vallarta.

This morning I walked to Walmart. I can see that complex from where I sit, but to get there, one has to go around the marinas, past the Naval Base, then take your life in your hands to cross the busy boulevard. I didn’t trust the policeman who kept telling me to go, when trucks and buses were coming around the corner aiming for me. I waited until some locals crossed, then I went with them. Whew! Adventure looms everywhere.

Today is going to be a relaxing day for me. I have an appointment at a spa later this afternoon for manicure, pedicure, 50 minute massage and a facial for a cost of approximately $55. We will see how that turns out.

Yesterday, I took a tour up to an old town far up in the Sierra Madre, reported to be the oldest town in this area. San Sebastián del Oeste was established in 1605, and flourished due to silver mining. After that, gold was discovered up there, so mining for those minerals, plus lead, made San Sebastián a busy place, with the population in 1900 being around 20,000 persons. Now, there are fewer than 1,000 residents. The town is kept clean and pretty, as it is considered one of the “Pueblos Majicos”, due to its history. The town receives a subsidy from the Mexican government to keep it historically correct, including the thick adobe walls of the buildings, and red tile roofs and the architecture. The streets are made of rock: big rocks, little rocks, all cemented together in an uneven hodge podge, it seemed to me. There are sidewalks for about half of the town. I had to laugh, as we saw cars proceeding down the street, slowly bumping up and down. Not that it was needed, for the cars could not go very fast, but the speed bump on one of the side streets was constructed of a heavy rope thrown across the street. It had obviously been there a long time, for it was pretty well enmeshed into the rocks of the street.

Before we got to San Sebastián, which, by the way, is a two-hour drive from Puerto Vallarta, we made three stops. Our guide told us that the first paved roads to that town were constructed in the 1960’s. Up till then, the only roads were dirt. Can you imagine, in the silver and gold mining days, goods and people had to be transported from Puerto Vallarta, where they arrived by ship. The primary means of transport, then, was by pack mule. The journey took two days.

Our first stop, about and hour from PV, was at a store called El Puente de Krystal, which I assume refers to the bridge over a huge ravine beside the store. I was happy that we stopped there, for Frank and I had visited that place on a tour a few years ago.

We watched a woman making home made tortillas from the masa de maiz. She had a big bowl of that lovely dough under the cloth beside her. When someone wanted a taco, she pulled off a ball of dough, pressed it into a tortilla, threw it onto the wood-fired stove top, let it cook until it puffed up, then she picked it up, turned it over. When it was done to her satisfaction, she pulled the tortilla off the grill, put it onto a small plate, then handed it to the customer. There were bowls of retried beans, pico de gallo, guacamole, shredded cheese and salsa prepared. The customer made his taco to his or her preference. I had two of the delicious tacos, for a cost of $1 each.

Our next stop was at a tequila factory, of course. Jalisco, the Mexican state we are in, is the birthplace of tequila, so on any tour, one ends up at a tasting of that beverage.

This place was very simple, with techniques for making tequila going back generations of this same family. They use pure blue agave, the leaves and the root, to begin the process.

I took tiny tastes of tequila, but I am not a connoisseur; others said it was very good.

Next, we visited a coffee farm. There, I did taste the product, and it was delicious. The coffee farm had been established over 100 years ago. There was a woman called Maria, who had been the mother of 21 children, who started the farm with her husband. She outlived him, so she continued the farm and coffee production. Her next-to-youngest son now runs the business, and he is getting up in years, also. Maria, by the way, lived to be 85 years old. I cannot even fathom having a baby almost every year, as she did, beginning with the first child when she was 15 years old, and her youngest, when she was 46. Holy moley! And then she ran the farm, which is about 20 acres, I believe.

We were given a lesson on coffee growing, harvesting, roasting. I also learned that this is an organic farm. An interesting side note is the farm uses natural pesticide: a mixture of oil, garlic and serrano pepper. Hmm. Sounds a lot like the recipe for shrimp ajillo I told you about in an earlier post, except the pepper or chile is different. I might try that on my plants at home and see if it will keep the squirrels away.

Our guide took us to a very nice restaurant in San Sebastián. It was tastefully decorated, and the food was scrumptious. We were served chicken mole, cheese quesadillas, shredded beef for tacos, rice and beans. I could see the cook making tortillas in the kitchen, and cooking them as needed.

We ended our tour in the town square, after visiting the church of San Sebastián.

All in all, it was a pleasurable day. After all that walking on the rocky streets, and listening to Mario tell us all the cultural information, we were a tired group that headed back to Puerto Vallarta. I was grateful to Mario, our guide, for in his real life, he is a history teacher. He gave us so much very good information, both on the history of Mexico and this area in particular, but he expanded more on the anthropological and sociological aspects of Mexico. I felt it was a very worthwhile trip, for me.

By the time I got back to the resort, though, my feet and my brain were tired. I settled into my room for a nap before I ventured out for dinner.

I stayed at the resort for dinner and was treated to a lovely sunset.

So, adios from Puerto Vallarta, until next time. This is, indeed, a restful place.

–Dolly

Original Post: Dolly Travels

Another Day in Puerto Vallarta – Dolly Travels

Author: , April 4th, 2019

Puerto Vallarta - Dolly Travels

!Hola, mi amigos,

Good morning, everyone,

It seems that time just is flying by, as every day I find something new to do; although, most of the time, I am simply relaxing and being lazy.

My youngest son, Rob, and his wife, Amy, joined me here a few days ago, so we have been exploring the town and the marina, primarily looking for the best food and drinks.

I have been here for 11 days already and I have eaten shrimp everyday. I am still not tired of it. Sometimes I have the fresh catch of the day, which so far has been either mahi mahi or red snapper, both of which have been delicious. If I have shrimp for lunch, then I might have the fish for dinner. Or vise versa.

One of my favorite dishes (above): Camarones in ajillo sauce. I had to look up the recipe. It is very simple, actually. The chef sautés garlic and chopped dried guajillo chiles in oil, then sautés the shrimp in that. The spicy oil is poured over the camarones when it is served. Here at the Tenampa pool bar, the shrimps are served with steamed veggies, a portion of rice, and for some reason, toasted bread. It is so good. I tell myself it is a healthy meal.

In the right, you can see the shrimp salad, which is another good choice. Those shrimp have also been sautéed in the chile oil.

Another favorite dish has been the fajitas del camarones. Just so much good food here, sometimes it is difficult to make a decision.

Okay, other than the food, walking has been on my agenda, nearly every day. I start my mornings with a three mile walk, up and around the marina, stopping for a Starbucks cappuccino, then continue on back to the condo. I have breakfast, then I write, every day, for at least an hour. Afternoons are devoted to relaxing by the pool or going into town.

Or, if I am not by the pool, relaxing by the beach, under a palapa, is also a pleasant way to spend the afternoon.

On Thursday afternoon, there was a big market at the marina. Tents were set up all around the perimeter of the marina, selling all different types of merchandise: food stalls, taco wagons, dessert tents, where slices of some of the most delicious-looking cakes were sold. One stall had huge pans of paella and more pans of gumbo. Fortunately, I had already eaten, or I might have made a pig of myself.

There were also Indian dancers performing.

Yesterday, there was high clouds over the city, making the day a bit cooler, but no rain.
As we walked along the Malecon, we could see the waves crashing onto the shore. We watched pelicans diving into this waves to catch fish. Those big birds dive so fast, and so straight down, I had to wonder if they every suffer broken necks. They were amazing to watch.

Today, on my walk through the marina, I once more spotted a big crocodile. I think he was waiting for me, for today, his head was out of the water, up on the rocks, and he was smiling at me.

I was too mesmerized this morning to think to take a picture, for all I could think of, was the Disney song, “Never Smile at a Crocodile”, from the movie, “Peter Pan”. Now, of course, I can’t get the song out of my head.

So, life is fun, and I am getting work done on my book. Most of all, though, I am relaxing. This vacation was much-needed and I appreciate all of you who helped me get to this lovely, restful place.

I will close with a sunset picture from a few days ago. Now, it is lunch time, and the camarones at Tenampa Bar are calling for me to come enjoy them.

So, I shall say,

Hasta la vista, until we meet again.

Dolly

Last Day of Hiking in the Dolomites – Dolly Travels

Author: , September 27th, 2018

Dolomites - Dolly Travels

Buongiorno, tutti,

We are now on a train, traveling south to Rome. We had to leave the beauty of the Dolomites this morning, for we have an early flight tomorrow from Rome, which will bring us back to California.

I am so glad we had those last four days in the Dolomites; the hiking, the lifts, the animals, the friendly people, plus the sheer beauty of the area was so enjoyable for all of us. Danny and Heather took another trail yesterday, and I took the Trail of the Witches that they had hiked the day before. This trail is considered an easy trail, but I do believe the classification of “easy” is all in the mind of the hiker. To me, it was a moderate trail, with rocky paths, some steep uphill walking, but manageable. Also, we found that the term, “hiking”, is not a word used very much. The kids found that people from Scandinavia do not have a word for that. Those people simply “walk” on the trails. While I thought eight miles was a pretty hefty walk, the Norwegians said they do that on a daily basis. I think I must be a wimp. I have learned, also, that if a trail marker says the next point will be 20 minutes, for me, it will be 40. I stop frequently just to admire where I am.

The trail followed the outer perimeter of one of the mountains. From the trail, quite often I could see over the rim to the valleys below.

At the overlook at that northern end of the meadow, there was a memorial cross. I counted four crosses up on that mountain.

Of course, since the trail leads through grassland, there were cows. This cow, named Dagmar, was not going to budge off the trail.

She and I had a conversation, but since she only understood German, I lost the debate. Finally, I did make my way around her. I knew her name, for I could read her name tag on her ear.

The path had some pretty little scenes along the way, such as this wooden bridge over a small stream.

At last, I could see our town, Castelrotto, sitting far, far below me. At that point of the trail, if I took a few steps to my right, I could have fallen halfway to Castelrotto. I was careful.

After lunch, I competed my walk back to Compatsch, then I took the cable car back down to the station, and the bus back to Castelrotto.

The kids beat me home; we compared notes, and I discovered that they had walked the trail that I had walked the first day, through the fields of flowers, the Nature Path.

All in all, we had a delightful four days, with plenty of exercise, fresh air, good food and wine, plus the added pleasure of meeting people from different countries; all of us had come to Alpe di Suisi to enjoy the beauty of the region.

Soon we will be back home, living our ordinary lives, with the memories of this fantastic vacation to keep us happy.

I hope you have enjoyed our trip to Italy with us. I will not blog again until we are home; probably rested, also. Please tell me your thoughts and views on these blog posts. I want all of you to enjoy the places that I visit.

Ciao for now,
Dolly

By Dolly Goolsby – Full Story at Dolly Travels

Dolomites Gay Travel Resources

 

More From the Dolomites – Dolly Goolsby

Author: , September 19th, 2018

Good evening, all,

We had another adventure on the mountains this morning. Today, the weather was quite different from yesterday. There was a cloud cover and it was pretty breezy and chilly, once we got up to Compatsch. I took it easy today, only taking a cable car up to Puflatsch and back again. However, the view from up there made me so happy just to be up in those mountains.

However, after I had some coffee at the restaurant, I walked out and looked toward the west. I love this view, for you can see across the top of Italy, into Austria. If there weren’t any clouds, I believe you could see to Switzerland.

The kids weren’t deterred by the weather. They took the Trail of the Witches, up to the Witches’ Benches, following the path that overlooks the valley and the villages down below.

I have never seen fuzzy cattle before. After I saw the picture, I knew I would have to make that hike myself, just to see these guys up close. Mama cow has already shed her winter coat, by rubbing it off on the trees. I think she is trying to help her baby get that old stuff off. Mama really needs to get her bangs cut.

My way of relaxing is just to view this peaceful valley with the grand mountains in the background. Although I did not hike today, I found my happy place where I could simply absorb the beauty of the Alpe di Suisi meadow.

Tomorrow will be another day for exploring up on the Alpe di Suisi. I will write more about that after we get back from that adventure.

I hope you are enjoying the Dolomites with us.

Ciao for now,

Dolly

By Dolly Goolsby – Full Story at Dolly Travels

Trentino Alto-Adige Gay Travel Resources

Visiting Venerable and Vivacious Vernazza – Dolly Travels

Author: , August 30th, 2018

Vernazza

Buona sera, tutti,

I am sitting at the Bar Ananasso, on the main piazza in Vernazza. I am looking out at the sea as I savor a new beverage, a limoncino spritz. Actually, I have never ordered one at a bar, but I do believe our traveling group invented this at the apartment in Florence, back in 2008. We called it Tuscan Lemonade. Whatever it is called it is delicious.

The time is 7:30 p.m. The sun seems to still be high in the sky, but the air is becoming a bit cooler. We arrived here in the early afternoon; as usual, we were very hungry. We went to the restaurant that sits at the very end of the harbor, where we could see the sea, and enjoy our lunch.

Later, the kids wanted to explore on their own; as I found out later, Heather went for a hike, Danny went for a nap. I went for a walk, also, but not as adventurous as Heather’s. This area is so lovely, especially now, at the end of the day, when the cruise ship passengers have left, the day trippers have left. Looking about me now, the restaurants on this piazza are full, but the area around me has just a few of us who are waiting to enjoy the sunset.

As I walked through the town today, I saw how well Vernazza has recovered from the terrible flood of October, 2011. The shops and the restaurants have been restored; life goes on as before. The old men were still paying cards at the tables on the piazza. The nonne (grandparents) were still spoiling the little ones with gelati.

This evening, I walked around the little town and observed the people winding down for the night, tourists and locals as well.

The church in the background is still one of my favorite places to visit. I wonder how many prayers have been offered for the safety of the fishermen from this church over the ages. The church was established in early 1300’s. Inside, the decor is simple, gothic style. It is still lovely.

Finally, the sun did set, leaving me with a serene view of the Ligurian Sea. I am so happy that we came here. Although I was a bit sad to leave Florence, I knew that this village would soothe my soul, and indeed it has. The sound of the sea is so calming, although I have seen this same quiet sea when it has lost its temper.

I will leave you with this vision of Vernazza. Tomorrow is another day, and I am certain I will have more pictures to show you.

Buona notte.

Ciao for now,
Dolly

By Dolly – Full Story at Dolly Travels

Vernazza Gay Travel Resources

More About Florence – Dolly Travels

Author: , August 23rd, 2018

Florence - Dolly Travels

Buona sera,

Now I can settle down. Mexico won their first World Cup game, defeating Germany, so we are more relaxed. The kids went to a bar to watch the game. I had to do some more walking through my favorite Italian city. I finally stopped and watched the last two minutes of the game, before coming back to the apartment.

Saturday morning, we decided to follow Rick Steves’ audiotour of the Renaissance Walk. We fought our way through the crowds around the Duomo, continued down via Calzaiuoli to Piazza Signoria, then across the Ponte Vecchio.

We stopped for a snack and cold drinks after the walk…the most expensive snack we have had. But I needed a break from the crowds.

On our walk back to the city, we stayed on the Oltrano side of the river, until we came to the next bridge, Ponte Grazie.

Later in the afternoon, the kids made a visit to Bargello galleria. There is so much to see in Florence. Danny and Heather had their list of places to see. They have more stamina than I do, so I simply walked all around my favorite city, watching the children at play, following some of the streets I know so well.

This morning, after breakfast, we walked up to Piazzale Michelangelo. It is quite a hike, but we made it. The view from up there is incredible; it made the walk worthwhile.

We walked down the hill, following the paths, and soon we were back in the city proper. We stopped for some lunch, then it was time to go home and take our afternoon nap. These one-hour naps are becoming quite the habit, but so necessary, especially after being out in the humid heat of the day.

Now we are all unwinding at home, making our plans for tomorrow, our last day in Florence.

Until next time,
Arrivederci,

Ciao for now,
Dolly