Gay Accommodations: Agriturismo Il Segreto di Pietrafitta, San Gimignano, Tuscany, Italy

Agriturismo Il Segreto di Pietrafitta Periodically we’ll feature one of our properties here to let our readers know about some great gay friendly places to stay.

Il Segreto di Pietrafitta is an elegant structure that rises on the gates of San Gimignano, the most famous medieval town in Tuscany. The origins of the structure are quite ancient, and many historical figures have slept within its walls. The Agriturismo is located on a dominant position, facing towards the magnificent town of San Gimignano. From here you’ll be able to easily reach Florence, Siena, and the Chianti region. There are also many wonderful small medieval towns to visit nearby, such as Volterra, Certaldo, Monteriggioni, and many others.
The structure offers 9 very comfortable rooms, meticulously decorated from local craftsmen, including floors covered with Cotto (typical Tuscan clay bricks), and wooden beams on the ceilings. No small details are left unnoticed here at Il Segreto di Pietrafitta!

See the Agriturismo Il Segreto di Pietrafitta Expanded Listing on Purple Roofs Here

Gay Friendly Bed and Breakfasts, Hotels, and Vacation Rentals in Southern Tuscany

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Gay Athens – The Gritty Elegance of the Greek Capital

Gay Athens I’ve pondered the progress of the Greek economic crisis with interest and confusion. Much of the xenophobic rhetoric around the crisis made me side with the Greeks long before I’d grasped the finer details of the situation. The austerity and injustice inflicted on the working class Greek people made me want to kick the banks, punch the City and poke the establishment. Instead, I went to Greece for a holiday.

Greek Tragedy

The media have largely portrayed a country torn apart and crumbling. On the news, we saw riots, poverty, outrage and destitution. Greece had seemingly lost its Shirley Valentine shine. My friend George hails from Thessaloniki and suggested a trip to his homeland. Despite my reservations, the wisdom of a local made the prospects much more inviting. He suggested a few nights in gay Athens, then a jaunt to one of the islands. In gay Athens, we stayed in a sensational Airbnb apartment, bang in the middle of Psyri, one of the edgier nightlife districts of Athens. The neighborhood was once home to revolutionaries during the war of Independence. It’s been a bohemian magnet for years, famed for raucous tavernas, hashish and rembetika. Today, Psyri’s a lively mix of working class industrial business, high-end hipsterism and dive party debauchery. In the space of a two minute mince, you’ll see ‘Fuck the Police’ graffiti, bustling hardware stores and speakeasy cocktail bars.

By Stewart Who – Full Story at Gay Star News

Greece Gay Travel Resources

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Gay Crete in a Nutshell

Gay Crete Say “Greece” to the travelling LGBT community and chances are most of them will think of Mykonos or Lesvos (aka Lesbos), but Crete — birthplace of Zeus, home to the Minoan civilization and the largest of the Greek islands — has much to offer the gay and lesbian traveller. Whether one’s interest is archaeology, lazing on the beach or seeing the sights, Crete impresses the visitor with its sheer size and variety of landscapes. To put Crete in perspective: Mykonos, at approximately 100 square kilometres, is about 50 percent bigger than Manhattan; Lesvos, at 1,630 square kilometres, is about half the size of Rhode Island. Crete, at more than 8,000 square kilometres, is 80 times bigger than Mykonos and bigger than the state of Delaware, but without so many people: its population is slightly more than 600,000 people, although it has several million olive trees and there are quite a few goats. What should be clear from this is that Crete is a big island and you are not going to see it all in one day. Indeed, I have lived here for 10 years and came to Crete on holiday six times in the three years before that and I still haven’t seen everything. So what is there on Crete for the LGBT tourist?

By Tim Mitchell – Full Story at Xtra

Greece Gay Travel Resources

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City Sundays: Rome

city-sundays-rome Hey all, Welcome to our weekly series on the blog and our Facebook travel groups – City Sundays. Each week we’ll select a different LGBT friendly city to talk about, and we’ll invite our innkeeper and travel agent/tour operator friends to come talk with us about it as well. Rome is one of our most favorite cities in all the world. The people there are very friendly, and it’s one of the most walkable cities, too – just get out on foot and explore. There’s something new (or something really really old) around every corner. Rome even has its own gay district, though it’s small by most standards – right in front of the Colosseum. There are many adventures within easy distance by train or car, including the ruins of Ostia Antica, where you can actually walk inside the old structures of what used to be Rome’s port city. Have you ever been? What did you do while you were there? Do you wanna go? Let’s chat! Join the conversation here: Gay (Men) Travelers: Gay Travel Club Lesbian Travelers: Lesbian Travel Club Transgender Travelers: Transgender Travel Club Bisexual Travelers: Bi Travel Club LGBT Families: LGBT Families Travel Club Check out our Rome page here: https://www.purpleroofs.com/europe/italy/itlazio.html And our Rome articles on the blog here: https://www.purpleroofs.com/gay-travel-blog/?s=Rome]]>

Eating My Way Through Northern Italy

Dani Globetrotter Girls One of the things I was most exciting about when I got on the train to Italy? The food, of course! I boarded the train in Germany in the morning knowing that I’d get off the train in Milan a few hours later, and all I could think about was what I’d be eating for my first meal in Italy. I love Italian food – the pastas, pizzas, breads and pastries, risotto and pretty much everything that I can eat as a vegetarian (I am always told I am missing out because the meat dishes and seafood are amazing, apparently). So while I’m inviting you to join me on a culinary tour of Lombardy and Veneto, the regions I traveled to on my recent visit, be warned: this is only a small fraction of all the good food Northern Italy has to offer, and it is the meat free version. When this decadent customs wasn’t feasible anymore because of rising gold prices, Lombardians still wanted their food to look as if gold was used, which is why the color yellow is omnipresent – in the most iconic dish of the region for example, Risotto Alla Milanese. The color comes from the saffron, which is the most expensive spice in the world – did you know that? In addition to saffron, lots of grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese and butter are used. As you can see in the picture below, ‘Alla Milanese’ can also be made with pasta, not just with risotto.milan spaghetti milanesaSpeaking of butter – Lombardians are not afraid to use butter and lard, especially in the polenta dishes. Polenta, a corn meal based dish is together with risotto the most common dish in the region, and is usually served with meat or vegetables.

By Dani – Full Story at Globetrotter Girls

Lombardy Gay Travel Resources

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