Cartenega, Colombia – Globetrotter Girls

Cartenega - Dani, Globetrotter Girls I made it to Colombia! I can’t believe that after all these years, I’m finally here. To give you a bit more background: when I (we) started traveling in 2010, I started in the U.S. and made my way south through Mexico and Central America. The goal was to go all the way down to Tierra del Fuego, taking a catamaran from Panama to Colombia via the San Blas Islands, which is supposed to be a beautiful trip (proven by the photos I’ve linked to!). However, by the time we made it to Panama, we had been traveling through Latin America for 9 months and were ready for a change of scenery & culture. So we hopped on a plane to Europe instead of a catamaran. When we returned to South America, we timed it so that we’d be in Argentina and Chile for their summer and flew into Buenos Aires. And never made it further north than Peru. Now, nearly five years after my first attempt to visit Colombia, I’m finally here. Admittedly, the trip didn’t start without hiccups (I’ll be talking more about them in my monthly roundup), but I am slowly easing back into the ‘Latino way of things’…

By Dani – Full Story at Globetrotter Girls

Colombia Gay Travel Resources

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Gay Life in Indonesia – Nomadic Boys

Nomadic Boys “OMG careful you don’t get caned for being gay over there you two!” We did of course point out to our concerned friends and family back home that Sharia Law is only in place in one small part of Indonesia in the Northern Aceh province. If the rainbow flag gets out of control in Aceh, you risk being convicted by the Sharia police to 10-150 lashes in public for being gay. And yes, this now applies to foreigners too! But we don’t go around waving rainbow flags. Nor do we have any interest in getting publicly canned in Aceh (our caning adventures at the Komodo National Park were more then enough)…

By Stefan Arestis – Full Story at the Nomadic Boys

Indonesia Gay Travel Resources

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Lesbian Iceland Road Trip: Icebergs, Waterfalls and Geysers – Globetrotter Girls

Dani - Iceland My trip to Iceland feels almost like a dream now. But the photos (and video!) show that it really happened – for a week, I road tripped through one of the most fascinating places I’ve ever visited. With its surreal landscapes that often made me feel like I was on a different planet, Iceland blew my mind. Otherworldly, that’s how most people describe Iceland, and to be honest, I don’t think there is a word that fits better than this: otherworldly. The only other place I’ve been to that I described as such were the otherworldly landscapes of Chile’s Atacama Desert, where I also came across volcanoes, a bizarre moonscape, rugged mountains amidst wide open barren lands, geysers and geothermal fields.

By Dani – Full Story at Globetrotter Girls

Iceland Gay Travel Resources

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Dubai's Arabian Nights – Keep Calm and Wander

Dubai - Alain Arabian Nights is, perhaps, associated with talented belly dancers showing off their dancing prowess to the delight of the crowd (mostly men?) while breathing their hookah in and out. Throw it with an rhythm of the inviting arabic music and the air is filled with amorous desires for mid-eastern beauties with hypnotizing, tantalizing gazes that would stick in your memory forever. Ok, I think that’s a very graphic description that raises internal libido—Hollywood style. While staying in Dubai for 4 days, I joined a desert sunset safari just 45 minutes drive outside the city. The sunset, of course, was magnificent–but that’s another blog post later here.

By Alain – Full Story at Keep Calm and Wander

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¡Hola, De Puerto Vallarta – Dolly Travels

Dolly Travels Our friend Dolly is on the go again, this time in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico: Buenas Tardes, Now I must switch to English. I have exhausted my Spanish vocabulary. Frank and I decided we needed another vacation; therefore, we flew down to Puerto Vallarta on Friday. We arrived at our hotel around 6:00 p.m., after spending almost 2 hours going through Immigration and Customs. The lines were long, but progressed smoothly. No one seemed to be upset or angry. Eventually, we retrieved our bags, ran the gauntlet through time share salesmen and found our taxi. We arrived here, at Club Regina, in time for Happy Hour. Our timing is impeccable. The hotel sits among lush green gardens, palm trees and swimming pools. At the western edge of the property is the Pacific Ocean. The setting is so peaceful and relaxing, although the buildings are painted white with bubble-gum pink accents, interspersed with bright yellow accents. I think that design is to keep the guests from getting too bored. After we got settle into our room, Frank and I walked down to a bar to have an evening cocktail. Frank could not get a martini, as the bar did not stock vermouth. We settled for a glass of Chardonnay each, as the bar did not have Pinot Grigio, either. Hmm. This could be a long week. We did have a delicious seafood dinner, though, and as we were both tired, we turned in early for a good night’s sleep. Yesterday, we went into town. The concierge told us we could get a taxi to town for about 100 pesos, which is a bit under $6.00 US. I asked if there wasn’t a bus that went to town. Yes, there was. We found the bus, paid our 7.50 pesos. ( 45 cents US). Not that we are cheap, but I thought the experience of taking local transport would be interesting. That it was. The buses run every 15 minutes, and are an efficient mode of transport, but we had to hang on tight, as the young driver weaved his way through traffic. Oh, to be young and fearless. We made it to our destination, though, safe and almost sound. Our destination was the Malecon, which is a one mile, 12 block promenade that borders the sea. This esplanade is traffic free, flowers and trees planted in a median all along the route. There are many sculptures in this area, as well as some innovative sand sculptures. Eventually, we reached the southern end of the Malecon. We knew there was an excellent restaurant nearby, and we found it. We went into an almost empty restaurant, as it was about 4:00 p.m by then. The waiter was very gracious. We told him we had been there before, several years ago. He was pleased that we remembered his restaurant and that we came back. After our late lunch, we then caught a bus going back toward our hotel. Another adventure. We got off the bus this time at Walmart. We wanted to buy some groceries, so we didn’t have to eat out every meal. Of course, our grocery bags were so heavy when we left, we got a taxi back to the hotel, for a cost of less than $4 US. We bought a papaya, a pineapple, some little limes, a couple of pastries, to make our breakfast this morning. The fruit was so delicious…we have enough papaya to last the rest of the week. The rest of our day was spent just being lazy..we watched football…(.hey, did the Seahawks get lucky, or what?) later, I went down to one of the pools. Nothing like floating on my back, looking up at palm trees and wispy clouds to relax the mind. We are having Happy Hour in our condo, then we will go down to a restaurant for dinner. Maybe. We have fruit, bread, cheese and wine here. Who could ask for anything more. So I will say, Adios, till next time. More adventures to come, I am sure. Your traveling blog writer, Dolly

By Dolly Goolsby – Full Story at Dolly Travels

Puerto Vallarta Gay Travel Resources

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Historical Bahrain Fort – Keep Calm and Wander

Bahrain Fort I was in Manama (Bahrain) for three days and two nights–and the whole time I was there, it rained. It did stop a few times during the day but it’s murky cloudy and then rain showers would come back and forth. I didn’t really explored the city much, except visiting the old Bahrain Fort, hiring a taxi to King Fahd Causeway and walking around Old Manama where I was billeted at Delmon International Hotel. Travel Tips: The best way to get to Bahrain Fort is via a taxi. Agree on the fare first before getting on. It’s 10-15 minutes from downtown. There’s no public transport that goes there. In fact, part of the road going there is unpaved. You can explore The Fort on your own. It’s free. Really, it’s free! Just make sure to tell the taxi driver to wait for you because it’s going to be hard to get one when you’re done.

By Alain – Full Story at Keep Calm and Wander

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TRAVELING IN OUR FABULOUS GAY WORLD: Planes, Trains, Automobiles and Buses

travel auto In the United States, there are basically only four ways to travel and that is by plane, train, automobile and buses. They all have their advantages as well as disadvantages. We prefer traveling by automobile since we have the luxury of time. Living in the center of the country, it only takes a couple of days or at the most 3 days to travel to either coast. Plus we enjoy seeing the sights and sounds and meeting new and interesting people along the way. If you fly, you usually need to rent an automobile anyway. Plus when driving you can take more clothing with you and purchase more items to bring back home with you. Our theory is ‘getting to a destination can be half the fun’. However we fully understand if you do live on either coast or do not have a lot of time, you have no choice than to fly. travel planeFor those who live in the upper Midwest or Northeast, they are forced to fly if they only have a week if they want to go to South Florida. Thousands of Gay men fly into Ft. Lauderdale during the winter months to get away from the frigid cold and snow. Fortunately in that town, the Gay resorts are close to the bars and shopping so an automobile is not always necessary. Otherwise one does need to rent an automobile. With all of the hassles in flying, we just prefer not to fly. travel trainAmtrak is another alternative however they scheduling is very ‘iffy’ to say the best. We took an Amtrak trip to California and back two years ago and although we were very lucky in not having any scheduling problems, Amtrak does present a lot of problems for travelers. Check out this website, http://www.consumeraffairs.com/travel/amtrak.html to read some of the hundreds of complaints about what passengers have written about their experiences riding on Amtrak and then decide for yourself if you want to try Amtrak. We now only would take Amtrak for a short trip less than 300 miles. travel busBuses are still around and although we have never taken one on a trip, there are those who really enjoy it. We have taken tour bus trips which is not to be confused with traveling across the country. With a tour bus trip you get on at one location and go directly to your destination and your luggage and accommodations are all taken care for you, whereas on a regular bus travel you have to book everything yourself. The bus terminals are usually downtown and sometimes right at the Amtrak station. On Amtrak they do have full restaurant services whereas on buses they do not. Some websites to check out are, for buses, www.greyhound.com and for trains, www.amtrak.com There are several automobile rental companies and many have great specials from time to time so check those out. Don and Ray Always remember to have fun when traveling, meet new people and talk to everyone! TRAVELING IN OUR FABULOUS GAY WORLD is written by Donald Pile and Ray Williams, Award-winning, Celebrity travel columnists who write for gay publications from coast to coast (And now legally married). Proud members of the IGLTA. You can email them at [email protected] and visit their website at http://gaytravelersataol.blogspot.com/

Las Vegas Gay Travel Resources
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Sri Lanka Travel: How Much Does it Cost? – Globetrotter Girls

Sri LankaI spent five weeks traveling around Sri Lanka just before the main tourist season started, still enjoying the bargain deals of the low season and seeing prices go up in the high season – this applies mainly to accommodation, however. I am breaking down all of my expenses in the country to give you an idea of what costs to expect when you budget for a trip to Sri Lanka. Overall, it has been one of the cheapest countries I’ve been to and it is possible to travel the country on $20 – $30 per person a day (on a shoestring), or around $50 per person per day in nicer accommodations. Read on for the full breakdown of food, transportation, sightseeing, accommodation and other costs.

Visa

A visa is required to enter Sri Lanka. Luckily it is easy to apply for a Sri Lankan visa online. The cost of a visa for Europeans, North Americans and Australians is US$35. The visa is valid for 30 days, if you’re planning to stay longer, you’ll have to get an extension in Colombo, which is LKR3,600 /US$25 (make sure to have a passport photo on you for that).

By Dani – Full Story at Globetrotter Girls

Sri Lanka Gay Travel Resources

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New York’s Magnificent Flatiron Building – Globetrotter Girls

New York Flatiron Building Dani Guys, I am freaking out! Only one more Polaroid from New York and I’ll be on my way to South America. I am torn between excitement and misery – on the one hand, I am drooling over pictures of pristine Caribbean beaches as I’ve finally started to plan my trip in more detail (I hope by the time the next Polaroid rolls around I know where I’ll rest my head when I arrive in Colombia in less than two weeks!), but on the other hand I am devastated about leaving New York.. as always! However, since it’s getting quite chilly now, I feel like it’s a good time to leave, and to know that when I get back, I won’t need my winter coat and boots anymore. As for the last week and what I’ve been up to.. I was happy that several friends who had left NYC for the Holidays were returning from their trips, making sure I wouldn’t turn into a crazy cat lady (I am looking after four cats at the moment..) by getting me out of the house more often again.

By Dani – Full Story at Globetrotter Girls

New York City Gay Travel Resources

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Eating My Way Through Northern Italy

Dani Globetrotter Girls One of the things I was most exciting about when I got on the train to Italy? The food, of course! I boarded the train in Germany in the morning knowing that I’d get off the train in Milan a few hours later, and all I could think about was what I’d be eating for my first meal in Italy. I love Italian food – the pastas, pizzas, breads and pastries, risotto and pretty much everything that I can eat as a vegetarian (I am always told I am missing out because the meat dishes and seafood are amazing, apparently). So while I’m inviting you to join me on a culinary tour of Lombardy and Veneto, the regions I traveled to on my recent visit, be warned: this is only a small fraction of all the good food Northern Italy has to offer, and it is the meat free version. When this decadent customs wasn’t feasible anymore because of rising gold prices, Lombardians still wanted their food to look as if gold was used, which is why the color yellow is omnipresent – in the most iconic dish of the region for example, Risotto Alla Milanese. The color comes from the saffron, which is the most expensive spice in the world – did you know that? In addition to saffron, lots of grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese and butter are used. As you can see in the picture below, ‘Alla Milanese’ can also be made with pasta, not just with risotto.milan spaghetti milanesaSpeaking of butter – Lombardians are not afraid to use butter and lard, especially in the polenta dishes. Polenta, a corn meal based dish is together with risotto the most common dish in the region, and is usually served with meat or vegetables.

By Dani – Full Story at Globetrotter Girls

Lombardy Gay Travel Resources

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