At the Gay Beach in Cuba

Cuba gay beach Mi Cayito, which is Havana’s unofficial gay beach, on Sunday afternoon turned into quite the party. Beachgoers were dancing perreo (an overtly sexual dance to reggaeton music) that leaves very little to the imagination. A group of men were playing volleyball while a lesbian couple cuddled under a makeshift umbrella they set up nearby. A young boy was flying a kite. It was a relaxing afternoon on my first full day in Cuba, which brought me to this section of Playas del Este that is roughly 15 miles east of Havana. The trip thus far seems a bit less uncertain — and dare I say less complicated — than when I visited the Communist island for the first time in May 2015. The process through which an American must go in order to travel to Cuba remains unnecessarily complicated, even though the Obama administration has formally restored diplomatic relations with the country. The cost of a 45 minute charter flight from Miami to Havana is simply absurd. The need to check into it four hours before its scheduled departure — which was at 2:30 a.m. on Saturday at Miami International Airport for me — is even worse. With this complaining aside, the little things appear to have been made a bit less complicated on this side of the Florida Straits.

By Michael K. Lavers – Full Story at The Washington Blade

Cuba Gay Travel Resources

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Out In Cuba: Gay Cuba Tour Operator

Out in Cuba Periodically we’ll feature one of our properties here to let our readers know about some great gay friendly places to stay: Out In Cuba offers LGBT travelers Cuba from a locals perspective. We are gay owned and operated and come to you from Healdsburg Ca. We have been offering LGBT friends and guests wedding and travel concierge services here in wine country for the past 6 years. We are Cuban by marriage and have spent extensive time in Cuba vetting and experiencing this great culture. Travel and culture are our passion. We have four LGBT tour guides in Cuba to welcome you upon your arrival. We offer exclusive custom designed tours of Havana and Cuba. Unlike other tour companies that offer you “GAY” tours, we are gay and understand the special needs of our community. Our goal is for you to have a secure and stress free visit to this great island. Call us – we are a bit ole fashioned in our hospitality.

See the Out in Cuba Expanded Listing on Purple Roofs Here

Gay Friendly Bed and Breakfasts, Hotels, and Vacation Rentals in Cuba

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Gay Cuba

Cuba We all have been reading the buzz around visiting Cuba. The questions we all have are: Cuba

  • Is it really legal to go?
  • Can I go with my lover/partner/spouse and feel comfortable traveling as an LGBTIQA couple?
  • Can I travel single and have a great time?
  • Is it still affordable to visit Cuba?
  • Is Cuba safe?
The answers are all a definite yes!!!! IMG_1891Thanks to the new loosening of travel restrictions from the USA and the recent advances in LGBTIQA equality…now is the time. To experience the architecture and energy of Havana is amazing. Music comes at you from ever cafe and corner. The architecture is both crumbling and being restored and is amazing. The best and most secure way to visit is to have a Gay tour guide to show you around. Be sure to book a hotel or ” Casa Particular” that is gay welcoming. A “Casa Particular” is usually someone’s home that they have restored to rent to people from outside of Cuba. Not only are you living with and having breakfast with locals but they can also offer you all kinds of ideas on travel through out the Island. [caption id="attachment_39871" align="alignright" width="250"]Cuba - Sydney Photo by Sydney Coatsworth[/caption]If gay politics and issues are your thing then Outincuba also employs one of Cuba’s most active LGBTIQA activists that can show you how the great strides in equality are happening today. Below you will find a list of some great resources for info on traveling to Cuba. Remember that you are not going to lay around on the beach… you are going to experience and learn about one of the worlds most vibrant and interesting cultures. Working with a gay owned tour and travel company is the best bet that you will find all the rooms you have reserved and also find the best gay welcoming locations to spend your hard earned free time and money. Charles Kimball of www.OutInCuba.co has Cuban family in Cuba and has spent time there vetting guides and locations that are LGBTIQA friendly and welcoming. The tour guides will meet you with a smile and welcome at the Havana airport and walk you through changing money and off you go in an old 50s taxi to your new home in Havana. Your guide and new friend will take you on a walking tour of Old Havana. If you would like to see “Gay Havana” by night then go out and experience the LGBTIQA culture from a Gay perspective. Last photo by Sydney Coatsworth]]>

Cuba, The New Gay Paradise?

Cuba - Photo by Kevin Slack My father left Cuba in June of 1962. The revolution was intensifying and as part of “Operation Peter Pan,” a program developed by the Catholic Church of which the church still denies ever existed, my grandparents placed him on the last Lufthansa flight out of Havana one morning. A young boy, my father wouldn’t see his parents for years to come. He has never returned. After decades, I became the first of my family to return to the island nation and left to my desires, I would have stayed. I’ll get to that in a minute. My father is proud, PROUD, of his homeland in the same way that I am PROUD of being a member of the LGBT community. Pride runs deep with Cubans and with us Verdugos. Over the last several years my father has opened up about the Cuba he once knew more than 50 years ago, and often shares his memories of Camaguey, the town in which he grew up. He spills stories about our cousins, but mostly he speaks of the beauty of this massive island. The crystal waters, the undisturbed beaches, the fishing, the music, and la gente. Our people. I grew up in Miami (aka Little Havana) surrounded by the vibrant and colorful, musical, passionate, sexy cultura of my people. However, something didn’t click for me. My parents divorced when I was two and so I had very little knowledge of my Cuban heritage at home. While soulfully drawn to it, it felt equally foreign. Something was amiss. There was a disconnect.

By Chris Verdugo – Full Story at The Advocate

Cuba Gay Travel Resources

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Gay Havana

Photo by Dennis Dean Photo by Dennis Dean[/caption] In old Havana there is a tree that’s said to be older than the city itself. It was here, though it was very young, when the Taino people would worship, venerate, and respect her as Ancient Mother. It was here too, though a little older now, in 1519 when the Spanish first established a settlement. The land was claimed, right beside her growing roots, as San Cristobal de la Habana. She provided shade for the first mass and bestowed a breeze for the first council meeting. And as she reached toward the heavens, so did a city. Becoming resilient and strong, prosperous and wealthy, devout and ideological–she soon had a home overlooking churches and plazas, statues and mansions that rivaled those of Europe. She felt the breeze of independence and briefly felt it taken away from her. As times changed, though, she witnessed the plight of the Cuban people under a dictatorship and felt the mumblings of revolution brush through her leaves. Then, in 1959, as winter drew to an end she was here still to feel the rumbling of a tank shake her roots to usher in spring and a new hope for her land. More than half a century later, the wind again sways her branches and one of her leaves falls in 2014, twirling like a Sky Dancer, landing flatly on my head. I am about to visit Havana, Cuba for a whirlwind three-day trip, and I decide before boarding a charter flight from Miami to Jose Marti International Airport, to drop the veil on my parochial American upbringing, to observe and reflect on a country that has persevered through difficult times, and embrace (not criticize) its convictions. Of course, actually being in Havana, exploring, and meeting the people, I am forced to modify this original declaration. Havana lends itself to open-minded tourists who should be curious about the political system, who want to question the state of the city, and who will dig deeper into the country’s modern-day ethos while understanding its past. And once you find yourself sharing a mojito with a local, you may be surprised to see just how open and honest they are about their lives and their country. As my journey unfolds, I find the city to be a living testament of its history and ideals, and I meet a proud people who have the strength to overcome obstacles that the modern-day traveler may not realize still exist. I am able to visit Cuba because of loosened travel restrictions on citizens of the USA thanks to a recent change in policy encouraged by President Barack Obama. Now, tour companies are allowed to operate in the island nation as long as they are licensed through the juggernaut education-based travel program called People to People. My trip is booked through Pride World Travel, a member of the IsramWorld portfolio of brands, which is beginning their LGBT-focused tours of Cuba in 2015. Because these are educational trips, Americans are still at the mercy of the Cuban government that works to organize specific itineraries for each group. If you don’t feel like going along with the plans, too bad. As long as the official government itinerary is in play, you’re required to be with your group. But as I learn during my trip, there is a leniency depending on your guide. Luckily, my itinerary is relaxed and filled with a steady stream of good food, fascinating people from the LGBT community (including my guide), and even time to relax at the gay beach.

By Joseph Pedro – Full Story at Passport Magazine

Cuba Gay Travel Resources

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