Five Gay Friendly Chile Hotels – Nomadic Boys

Author: , August 16th, 2017

Gay Friendly Chile Hotels

Chile is one of the most developed countries in South America with a large gay scene in the capital city of Santiago. We travelled from the Northern tip of this long thin country in the San Pedro desert all the way to Torres del Paine in the South. These are our 5 favourite Gay Friendly Chile Hotels that we tried along the way, which we loved and felt completely welcomed as a gay couple.

#1 Alto Atacama: San Pedro de Atacama

Alto Atacama is the gay friendly place you need to base yourself in San Pedro. As well as being extremely welcoming to LGBT travellers, it’s a luxurious, exclusive resort with the backdrop of the Salt Mountain Range. It offers full board packages with guided tours tailored to each guest. It’s the best way to discover the landscapes around San Pedro, which rank as some our favourite computer screen backgrounds.

Meals at Alto Atacama are delicious and unique, with gems like ostrich carpaccio with raspberries. They also make delicious Pisco Sours, which is even more heavenly when enjoyed at one of their outdoor plunge pools. To find out more, read our about our stay at this gay friendly hotel in San Pedro.

All inclusive packages at Alto Atacama start from $650/£520 per person per night. You can check availability and read more about Alto Atacama on Tripadvisor.

By Stefan Arestis – Full Story at the Nomadic Boys

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Gay Santiago: The Best Bars, Clubs and Hotels – Nomadic Boys

Author: , July 5th, 2017

Gay Santiago

Chile is well known as being one of the most economically developed countries in Latin America, but its society is still very conservative.

However, gay Santiago, the capital city has a huge gay scene, mainly around the Bellavista neighbourhood, with many gay bars, clubs and parties happening almost every day of the week.

After spending several months in Santiago and using it as a home base, it became one of our favourite places in South America. From our experience in Chile’s big capital city, we’ve put together this gay guide to Santiago, featuring our favourite gay bars, clubs, hotels and things to do in the city.

Gay Santiago Bars

Bombero Nuñez is the street in the Bellavista neighbourhood where you’ll find the majority of the gay bars and clubs of Santiago. Although most gay bars don’t get busy until after 10/11pm, there are a few gay restobars you can visit if you want to go somewhere beforehand.

Station Bar: Station restobar is one of the largest gay hangouts in Santiago, which gets busy after 6pm. We love coming here for early evening cocktails. Due to the licensing laws, you’re required to order food with your drinks, so it maybe worth having your dinner here as well. Station is open everyday except Sundays and is located at Antonia Lopez de Bello 064 in Bella Vista.

Bar 105: popular gay bar in Santiago and despite being quite small, always attracts a large crowd. For us Bar 105 was our favourite gay bar to warm up the evening with a few pisco sours before heading out to the nearby clubs. Bar 105 is open from Thursday to Sunday from 10pm till late and is located at Bombero Nuñez 105.

Burdel: this place gets busy because of its 2 for 1 drinks promotions and occasional drag shows. Burdel is open from Monday to Saturday from 10pm till late and is located at Ernesto pinto Lagarrigue 282.

By Stefan Arestis – Full Story at the Nomadic Boys

Chile Gay Travel Resources

Forty Eight Hours in Santiago – Globetrotter Girls

Author: , May 24th, 2017

Santiago Chile - Dani

The booming Chilean capital can be hard to figure out for some tourists, but Santiago has so many beautiful attractions – from sprawling markets to vast parks, and picturesque neighborhoods to world-class museums. 48 hours is nowhere near enough time to soak up the true nature of this five million strong South American city, but following this guide will give you a true taste of the city, from its main attractions to its most charming markets and quarters, plus where to find the best views and where to devour typical Chilean dishes and drinks.

Day 1

10am: Plaza De Armas And The Cathedral

Before you start your tour, get yourself a BIP card for public transport (available in all metro stations). You can buy single use tickets for the city’s efficient, clean, art-packed metro system, but buses accept BIP cards only, so it makes the most sense to use it for both. Pay 1,500 Pesos ($2.20) and then load it with as much credit as you need – 5,000 Pesos ($7.36) should be plenty even for an active 48 hours in Santiago.

Exit the metro at the beautiful Plaza De Armas, the city’s central plaza and home to kilometro zero, the central point from which the city has continued to sprawl out in all directions. The plaza is home to historic buildings such as the incredibly ornate Central Post Office, the Palacio de la Real Audiencia and, as in nearly every Latin American city, the main cathedral. Although it might appear a bit bland from the outside, do not skip a trip inside, which is packed with impressive details and treasures you would never guess were there from the building’s façade.

By Dani – Full Story at Globetrotter Girks

Chile Gay Travel Resources

Santiago, Chile – Crown Jewel of the Andes

Author: , January 27th, 2017

Santiago - pixabay

As a child I would look at maps and think how ridiculous Chile looked. Stretched out and elongated, it defied all the norms about the shapes of countries. I never got round to finding out why it was that shape. Now, it was obvious.

I was on a flight from Sao Paulo in Brazil into Santiago – the capital of Chile – and the pilot had just warned us to fasten our seat belts in anticipation of turbulence as we flew over the Andes. This mountain range stretches from one end of South America to the other. It defines the Chilean boarder with its neighbours Argentina and Bolivia. Chile is basically the gap between the Andes and the Pacific Ocean.

The Andes not only define the boarder of Chile, but rise up and tower over the city of Santiago itself. These mountains help create a climate which, during the UK’s winter months, allows bright, dry, hot sunshine day after day. In January and February, Santiago hardly sees any rain. There are infinite cloudless skies, and temperatures heading into the 86 F and upwards.

Full Story at Gay Star News

Chile Gay Travel Resources

Visiting Santiago, Chile

Author: , July 14th, 2014

Santiago, Chile - Laura MottaSantiago, Chile feels like a new city. With most of its colonial architecture flattened by earthquakes, and mirrored high-rises towering against the snow-covered Andes, it can be tough, at first, to see the more intimate side of this South American city. Here are two neighborhoods chock-full of quaint boutiques, natty coffee houses, a boutique hotel or two, spirited street art, and a genuine sense of place amongst the skyscrapers.

Barrio Italia

This isn’t exactly a new hangout. Barrio Bellavista has been Santiago’s Bohemian haunt since Pablo Neruda built a home there in 1953. Called La Chascona, the house is now a museum and is open to visitors. Surrounding the home, you’ll also find brightly painted murals and a fountain dedicated to the poet.

Wander the adjacent streets to discover chic bars, restaurants, the local zoo, and swaths of students coming and going from the nearby university campus. A tip for exploration: Scout out places you’d like to try in daylight and then head back for dinner (around 9-11 p.m.) with a restaurant and bar-hopping plan.

By Laura Motta – Full Story at Shermans Travel | Chile Gay Travel Resources