Queer Travel In Asia… Is It Safe?

Author: , January 16th, 2019

Gay Travel in Asia - The Globetrotter Guys

Gay travel in Asia can be confusing to say the least. A lot of people will look up gay rights in Asia and for the most part be disappointed. However, don’t let this discourage you! Back in 2012, we spent 3 months travelling from Thailand through to Cambodia, Vietnam, Laos, Malaysia and Bali. We experienced this part of Asia as a gay couple and only had positive experiences.

We returned to Asia again in 2017 for our honeymoon, where we spent 3 weeks in the Philippines. When it comes to gay travel in Asia, the Philippines is one of the more advanced countries. There is still work to be done, like anywhere, but overall we had a wholly positive experience.

Quite simply, often the laws of the country don’t match the reality of being there as a tourist. While some people may say not to travel to countries until they have better laws, as long as you are safe as a tourist, you could be helping by representing the local LGBT community.

We have compiled our ‘Gay Travel Asia Guide’ to help you navigate the countries we visited. We want to compare the laws to the reality as a gay traveller in Asia. Read on to find out more, and feel free to share your own experiences in the comments.

Full Story at The Globetrotter Guys

Asia Gay Travel Resources

LGBTQ Albuquerque – Travel Pulse

Author: , January 14th, 2019

LGBTQ Albuquerque - Travel Pulse

Albuquerque is a fascinating and dynamic city, sometimes overlooked by travelers. Similarly, the city is under the radar as a queer destination. But the city and region are very queer-friendly, and there are many reasons why LGBTQ travelers should consider New Mexico’s largest city for their next trip.

According to Mauro Walden-Montoya, President of the Albuquerque LGBTQ Chamber of Commerce, the city has been used to diversity since its founding, way back in 1706.

“With the Native, Spanish and other cultures mixing for so many years, LGBTQ folks have been naturally accepted. It is easy to be LGBTQ in Albuquerque and we are very welcoming to residents and visitors alike,” he said. “New Mexico was the 17th state to legalize same-sex marriage, and Albuquerque welcomed thousands of LGBTQ couples from other states like Texas, Arizona, Colorado and as far away as Virginia who came to get married here.”

Walden-Montoya noted that one hotel welcomed a same-sex male couple from Dallas, who flew in on a Sunday evening to get married. They planned to have the ceremony on Monday and then leave that evening.

“The hotel manager sent them out sightseeing before the minister arrived. When they came back for their wedding, she had gotten them a cake (from an LGBTQ-friendly bakery) and decorated the lobby for their wedding. She and a staff member were their witnesses,” he said.

By Paul Heney – Full Story at Travel Pulse

Albuquerque Gay Travel Resources

 

Queer Provincetown Paradise – Stuff.Co.NZ

Author: , December 19th, 2018

provincetown - pixabay

Cape Cod is a tiny peninsula that stretches out, claw-like, from Massachusetts’ capital Boston. It’s about a three-hour drive, making it a popular summer escape for Bostonians and New Yorkers.

At the tip is the popular party town of Provincetown, the town that gave Anthony Bourdain his start in the kitchen as a dishwasher and a line cook. He referred to it as “paradise”, and once you’re there, you understand why. Long since known as a tolerant, free-spirited artist enclave, it’s also the hottest gay and lesbian destination in the north-east US.

You can still visit two places he name-checks in Parts Unknown’s Massachussetts episode. The first is the Lobster Pot, a two-storey whitewashed corner building on the beach with neon signage and splendid views. Bourdain missed its Portuguese kale soup, a local dish introduced by fishermen from the Azores, islands that lie between Provincetown and Portugal.

By Kylie McLaughlin – Full Story at Stuff.co.nz

Queer Provincetown Travel Resources

 

Life & Art in Queer Vienna – Passport Magazine

Author: , October 1st, 2018

Vienna - Pixabay

If you plan on visiting Vienna in 2018, you’re in for a treat. This year, the city will be celebrating the lives and artistic creations of Klimt, Schiele, Moser, and Wagner. These virtuosos, who coincidentally all died in 1918, together help make Wien a mecca for fine arts that continues to this day.

As a destination for art lovers, the Belvedere Museum & Palace (www.belvedere.at) is a banquet. Walking through its galleries, one gets the feeling the ghost of Gustav Klimt is present. The museum was built in the 18th century for Prince Eugene of Savoy as a summer residence; the prince, who was gay, had numerous palaces built during his reign. This one is sprawling and majestic, the very definition of palatial. It comprises two imposing white buildings overlooking extensive formal gardens, a large pond, and elaborate statuary and fountains.

Featured here is Klimt’s most famous “The Kiss” and many other of his works. Also on display are paintings by other artists, hanging in galleries on a background of dark red wallpaper under the sparkle of Vienna’s ubiquitous crystal chandeliers. Kokoschka, Klimt’s friend and a member of his inner circle, is represented here, as is the Norwegian artist Edvard Munch, his contemporary. There is also a comprehensive collection of the statues of the contorted faces created by the 18th-century artist Franz Xaver Messerschmidt.

Literally, days can be spent exploring the works in the upper and lower buildings. It’s also one of the only museums to allow visitors to photograph its masterpieces.

Find more of Klimt at the newer Leopold Museum (www.leopoldmuseum.org), which offers the largest collection of modern Austrian art; the Secession Building (www.secession.at) that features Klimit’s notable “Beethoven Frieze”; and at the Kunsthistorisches Museum (www.khm.at/en) where his frescoes are displayed. There are also images of his works on watches, dishes, pads, and pens everywhere you look.

By Marlene Fanta Shyer – Full Story at Passport Magazine

Austria Gay Travel Resources

Queer Mexico – The Telegraph

Author: , August 16th, 2018

queer Mexico - pixabay

Mexico’s culture draws tens of millions of visitors every year, from its colourful Day of the Dead celebrations to the national reverence for gastronomy that means there is something delicious to taste around almost every corner. As a Latin American country, it might not be the first place that the phrase “LGBT+ travel destination” makes spring to mind, and of course, the Catholic church exerts a conservative influence, but legislatively it’s a different story.

Same-sex sexual activity has been legal here since 1871; same-sex marriage has been legal in Mexico City since 2010 and many states since; discrimination is outlawed.

Pride festivals are expanding across the country – so I decided to visit in June, Pride month, to see how Mexico fared as a long-haul travel destination for the LGBT+ community (that’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, plus a number of groups with other orientations and identities).

My first stop was Puerto Vallarta, put on the map by Elizabeth Taylor, who frequented it with Richard Burton in the Sixties. It now has a reputation as a gay-friendly seaside resort town. I’d been told to expect possibly the best fish tacos of my life, and spent a sensational few hours on the Mex-ology Vallarta Food Tour (£56), which gloriously combined tequila and tacos.

I discovered El Cuñado, the oldest (and best) street stand in town, and also La Palapa, a favourite dining haunt of Taylor’s, where days before, the annual Pride festival had seen drag queens race up the cobbled hill in stilettos. Along from here I found Mantamar Beach Club, popular with an older, gay male crowd, and its specifically LGBT-friendly hotel Almar, which hosts same-sex weddings and pool parties for Pride at its rooftop bar.

By Rachel Crenshaw – Full Story at the Telegraph

Mexico Gay Travel Resources

Queer Stockholm – Out Magazine

Author: , March 29th, 2018

Queer Stockholm - pixabay

A while ago, I had a conversation with my boyfriend that stayed with me. He’s American, and just recently moved in with me in my Stockholm apartment, having lived in New York City for eight years. As I started showing him the city, I was intrigued to hear his reactions. He seemed surprised. Where were all the gay bars? Why did I seem less comfortable engaging in PDA on the subway in Stockholm than he does in New York? And where exactly, if Stockholm is so gay, were the drag queens? Stockholm’s gay scene seemed poorer than my boyfriend had expected. Did he as a foreigner think I was living in some kind of gay utopia?

It wouldn’t be strange. Hell, Wikipedia’s page on the subject starts off with “LGBT rights in Sweden have been regarded as some of the most progressive in Europe and in the world.” But what does that actually mean for queer life? Granted, Stockholm is much smaller than New York. Still, I wondered: how would an LGBTQ tourist visiting the city perceive it? And what would help them make a more informed travel choice?

Here is what every LGBTQ tourist visiting Stockholm should know.

By Erik Galli – Full Story at Out Magazine

Sweden Gay Travel Resources

24 Hours in Queer Winnipeg – Travel Pulse

Author: , March 28th, 2018

queer Winnipeg - pixabay

Winnipeg is a delightful city and a surprisingly queer-friendly destination that’s not on the radar of many Americans. But what if a queer traveler had a single day to sample its pleasures? What would be at the top of the list? Matt Schaubroeck, Corporate Communications Specialist for Tourism Winnipeg, gave us some pointers.

“There’s always so much to do in Winnipeg—we’re a four-season city filled with attractions, restaurants and entertainment that’s sure to have something for everyone to enjoy,” said Schaubroeck. “I’d recommend starting at The Forks, where the Red and Assiniboine rivers meet. You’ll find one of Winnipeg’s best tourist attractions there, featuring bike rentals in the summer or skate rentals in the winter. You can take the river trail (when it’s cold, one of the world’s longest winter skating trails) throughout the heart of the city including our French district, St. Boniface and our architecturally stunning Exchange District.”

The city doesn’t have one specific “gayborhood,” as queer residents and businesses are somewhat uniformly spread out among the larger city.

By Paul Heney – Full Story at Travel Pulse

Queer Winnipeg Travel Resources

The Sacre Coeur in Paris – Keep Calm and Wander

Author: , February 5th, 2018

Sacre Coeur in Paris - Keep Calm and Wander

Before visiting, get to know these interesting facts about Sacre Coeur in Paris. It’s a minor Roman Catholic basilica that sits atop Montmarte, the city’s highest summit. You’ll see it from the top of Eiffel Tower or from Notre Dame Cathedral. Its domes look different from any Catholic churches you’ve seen before. If my memory serves me right, I’ve never seen anything like these.

Sacre Coeur, in English, is translated as the Sacred Heart which of course refer to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Montmarte means the “Mount of the Martyr.”

The basilica was built in 1975 but its construction was completed in 1914. However, it was only sanctified when the World War 1 ended in 1919. Paul Abadie designed this imposing church overlooking the city of Paris.

By Alain – Full Story at Keep Calm and Wander

Paris Gay Travel Resources

Most Popular Paris Queer Friendly Hotels – Gay Star News

Author: , January 4th, 2018

Paris queer friendly hotels - pixabay

If you’ve never been to Paris before, there is an enormous list of must-do tourist essentials that will easily fill your time during your stay. Climb the Eiffel Tower. Wander around the Louvre. Stroll along the Seine. Sit in cafe and look intellectual…
But Paris is more than just the obvious sightseeing cliches. Each time that you return to this city you discover a little more, experience something different, and immerse yourself in the day-to-day rhythm of the French capital.

One of the key ingredients for a great Paris experience is the right accommodation.
You need something that’s within your budget. You’ll also need a location that puts you in the heart of the action. If you’re an LGBTI traveler, then you’re going to want a hotel that’s happy to welcome you.

We’ve checked the available statistics and consulted a few experts to see which hotels in Paris are currently the most popular with LGBTI visitors:

Hotel du Vieux Saule: Popular, great-value hotel in the heart of Le Marais.

By Gareth Johnson – Full Story at Gay Star News

Paris Gay Travel Resources

Traveling While Queer

Author: , January 4th, 2018

Traveling While Queer

Do you get excited at the thought of packing up the car and heading home for the holidays or setting off on a cross-country road trip? I don’t.

When my girlfriend, Lara, and I travel on the road, we have to take precautions. We’re constantly on guard against strangers. Lara is a transgender woman of color, and at rest stops I’m never far from her side, guarding her like a Secret Service agent. Lara doesn’t want to stop at gas stations, and she’ll have me pump gas so that no one can see her and try to size her up.

Late one evening this year, Lara and I were driving home to Charlotte, N.C., from Wilmington, N.C., a three-hour trip. We stopped at a service station in a small town called Whiteville. As I filled the tank and Lara sat in the car, I saw a group of people who could have been extras on “Duck Dynasty” gathered by two pickup trucks. I could feel them glaring at us.

One truck screeched out of the gas station, while the other remained. I got into the passenger seat without telling Lara what I saw and fell asleep. About an hour later, she woke me up with words you never want to hear: “We’re being followed.”

By Joanne Spataro – Full Story at the New York Times