Ravenna’s Magnificent Mosaics at the Basilica di San Vitale – Keep Calm and Wander

Author: , June 18th, 2018

Basilica di San Vitale - Keep Calm and Wander

Ravenna is called “The City of Mosaics” for places such as the Basilica di San Vitale. I was dazzled by the Byzantine mosaics that played before my eyes and I couldn’t help but contemplate all its historical attributes of this place, not to mention its architectural magnificence.

The first stone foundation of the basilica was laid in 526 and after treacherous years of construction, it was finally completed by the 27th Bishop of Ravenna known as Maximian.

The Splendid Mosaics of Basilica di San Vitale in Ravenna

The basilica has all the elements of Roman Empire from its dome, towers, doorways, and that of the Byzantine elements of narrow bricks, perfectly illustrious mosaics and a polygonal apse. That is the structural brilliance that the place is built with.

However, more than this, what really captures the eyes and the heart of a visitor are the mosaics that are dotted around the building, lining its walls, and creating moving depictions of the old testament – all the way up to the dome.

By Alain – Full Story at Keep Calm and Wander

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Mausoleo di Galla Placidia in Ravenna – Keep Calm and Wander

Author: , April 30th, 2018

Mausoleo di Galla Placidia in Ravenna - Keep Calm and Wander

I am an admirer of ancient art. And when I glance back at the time I spent in Mausoleo di Galla Placidia or the Mausoleum of Galla Placidia, I feel that my thirst for the arts, especially the mosaic art, had been partly quenched.

To describe this small mesmerizing place, I’d go with what UNESCO has said about it: “It is the earliest and best preserved of all mosaic monuments, and at the same time one of the most artistically perfect.”

1. It is still unknown what the building was built for

Surprisingly enough, by the looks of it, one would think that it is a chapel. The Byzantine mosaics dotted on the ceiling, the walls, and the floor say much about it pertaining to its role as a chapel. However, till date, no one quite knows what it was built for. I asked one of the men there about its story and he said that this building was built by Honorius’ sister Galla Placidia. Honorius was the Roman ruler at that time. Just like me, ahem, Galla Placidia also loved arts and crafts and, reportedly, she poured all of her love in creating the captivating mosaics lining the walls of this place. But more than her love for the arts, it seems that she built it as a mausoleum for her and her family.

By Alain – Full Story at Keep Calm and Wander

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The Mosaics of San Marco Basilica – Keep Calm and Wander

Author: , October 12th, 2017

San Marco Basilica - Alain

These mosaics of San Marco Basilica are from 11-th century but they never lose their luster. They’re our windows to Byzantine arts.

Be warned: you can’t take photos inside St. Mark’s Basilica. While there’s no entrance fee, the number of visitors allowed to get inside is controlled, limited. There’s usually a queue outside in the morning and late afternoon. Go inside at lunch time when tourists try to avoid the nasty summer heat. A huge hat or an umbrella can be helpful, too.

One of the most interesting things to ogle at Basilica di San Marco is the presence of mosaics. You can’t miss them. They’re ubiquitous inside and on the facade of this holy place. You’ve got to remember that these mosaics date back from 11th century. Though their colours aren’t as brights as ages ago, they refuse to fade.

Except for the last mosaic (which I took near the entrance), the rest were taken from the facade. The ones that decorate the portals outside are said to be the oldest mosaics of the basilica.

By Alain – Full Story at Keep Calm and Wander

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