Las Pozas Garden in Xilitla, Mexico – Once Upon a Journey

Author: , September 8th, 2018

Las Pozas garden - Once Upon a Journey

Walking in the surrealist garden of Edward James, Las Pozas, makes you feel like you are in a totally different world. A world where fantasies and imaginaries come to life. We feel like true explorers, walking in a jungle, not knowing what we see next or where we end our exploration. It’s a place we recommend everybody going to, it’s a hidden gem located deep in the Mexican mountains. Definitely one for on the bucket list!

HISTORY OF LAS POZAS

Las Pozas garden was created by the British poet Edward James. He moved to Xilitla where he started growing exotic plants. But in 1962 frost and blizzards destroyed all of his orchids, he decided to make something permanent which the weather couldn’t destroy. He wanted to create his version of the ‘Garden of Eden’ with giant concrete sculptures. It took him 20 years from 1949 until his death in 1984, to design and build the concrete structures resembling floral elements, which costs over 5 million dollars. And yet, most sculptures are still unfinished.

Las Pozas, the Pools in Spanish, is named after the pools covering the place, coming from waters that flow naturally through it. There’s also a beautiful waterfall.

HOW TO GET THERE

The surrealist garden is located in the jungle near a small mountain village called Xilitla, in the province San Luis Potosí, Mexico. To get to Xilitla you can drive there yourself by rental car (like we did), or go by bus. It’s about an eight-hour drive from the capital. Be prepared for a long trip with winding roads. If you have time and money we really recommend renting a car. You will have the freedom to go where you want and to explore authentic Mexican places, like this place!

By Roxanne & Maartje – Full Story at Once Upon a Journey

Mexico Gay Travel Resources

Queer Mexico – The Telegraph

Author: , August 29th, 2018

queer Mexico

Mexico’s culture draws tens of millions of visitors every year, from its colourful Day of the Dead celebrations to the national reverence for gastronomy that means there is something delicious to taste around almost every corner. As a Latin American country, it might not be the first place that the phrase “LGBT+ travel destination” makes spring to mind, and of course, the Catholic church exerts a conservative influence, but legislatively it’s a different story.

Same-sex sexual activity has been legal here since 1871; same-sex marriage has been legal in Mexico City since 2010 and many states since; discrimination is outlawed.

Pride festivals are expanding across the country – so I decided to visit in June, Pride month, to see how Mexico fared as a long-haul travel destination for the LGBT+ community (that’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, plus a number of groups with other orientations and identities).

My first stop was Puerto Vallarta, put on the map by Elizabeth Taylor, who frequented it with Richard Burton in the Sixties. It now has a reputation as a gay-friendly seaside resort town. I’d been told to expect possibly the best fish tacos of my life, and spent a sensational few hours on the Mex-ology Vallarta Food Tour (£56), which gloriously combined tequila and tacos.

I discovered El Cuñado, the oldest (and best) street stand in town, and also La Palapa, a favourite dining haunt of Taylor’s, where days before, the annual Pride festival had seen drag queens race up the cobbled hill in stilettos. Along from here I found Mantamar Beach Club, popular with an older, gay male crowd, and its specifically LGBT-friendly hotel Almar, which hosts same-sex weddings and pool parties for Pride at its rooftop bar.

By Rachel Cranshaw – Full Story at The Telegraph

LOCATION Gay Travel Resources

Cenotes Near Cancun – 2TravelDads

Author: , August 24th, 2018

Cenotes Near Cancun - 2TravelDads

The Yucatan Peninsula is full of unique experiences from Mayan ruins and swimming with sea turtles to jumping into enormous natural swimming pools: cenotes. Cenotes are really a highlight to any Cancun vacation or road trip around the Yucatan and we’ve chosen our favorites, the best cenotes to visit in Mexico.

This handy how-to guide is also full of information about what you need to bring for a day in the cenotes, what to expect with the many types of cenotes, and our top tips for photographing cenotes and all the fun you can have.

What is a cenote and how do I visit?

Cenotes are a type of cave or sinkhole. They are typically formed in the same manner as caves with fresh water percolating through the earth and meeting up with the aquifer, or underground river. This erosion creates small and large holes in the earth’s surface and gives access to the beautiful, crystal clear waters of the aquifer.

What to expect at different cenotes

Because each cenote is different from the next, you’ll have totally different experiences. The cenotes near Cancun and Playa del Carmen are more built up around the exterior to make it easier for tourists to visit, but then as you go inland you’ll find cenotes that are much more rugged and surrounded by jungle.

One cenote near Playa del Carmen, Cenote Azul, is very open with many different fresh water pools surrounding a large one, yet Cenote Dos Ojos near Tulum are very dark caves with a slow flowing river moving you through the caverns. Some cenotes have fish in them and bats flying overhead and others are just a grand bubbling spring like you might find in Florida.

Queer Mexico – The Telegraph

Author: , August 16th, 2018

queer Mexico - pixabay

Mexico’s culture draws tens of millions of visitors every year, from its colourful Day of the Dead celebrations to the national reverence for gastronomy that means there is something delicious to taste around almost every corner. As a Latin American country, it might not be the first place that the phrase “LGBT+ travel destination” makes spring to mind, and of course, the Catholic church exerts a conservative influence, but legislatively it’s a different story.

Same-sex sexual activity has been legal here since 1871; same-sex marriage has been legal in Mexico City since 2010 and many states since; discrimination is outlawed.

Pride festivals are expanding across the country – so I decided to visit in June, Pride month, to see how Mexico fared as a long-haul travel destination for the LGBT+ community (that’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, plus a number of groups with other orientations and identities).

My first stop was Puerto Vallarta, put on the map by Elizabeth Taylor, who frequented it with Richard Burton in the Sixties. It now has a reputation as a gay-friendly seaside resort town. I’d been told to expect possibly the best fish tacos of my life, and spent a sensational few hours on the Mex-ology Vallarta Food Tour (£56), which gloriously combined tequila and tacos.

I discovered El Cuñado, the oldest (and best) street stand in town, and also La Palapa, a favourite dining haunt of Taylor’s, where days before, the annual Pride festival had seen drag queens race up the cobbled hill in stilettos. Along from here I found Mantamar Beach Club, popular with an older, gay male crowd, and its specifically LGBT-friendly hotel Almar, which hosts same-sex weddings and pool parties for Pride at its rooftop bar.

By Rachel Crenshaw – Full Story at the Telegraph

Mexico Gay Travel Resources

Yucatan Road Trip – 2TravelDads

Author: , August 3rd, 2018

Yucatan Road Trip

We will never not appreciate how colorful Mexico is. From our trips around Baja California Sur to road trippin’ on the Yucatan, there are always new places to enjoy. The colorful towns of the Yucatan are exceptionally cool and fun, and each is so different! OMG, road trip theme: colorful towns and street art. Okay, here you go!

Starting in Cancun, since that’s where you fly into usually, grab your rental car and plan your stops. The plan I’ve made here is good for a four to six day road trip focusing on towns and relaxation, but it could easily be stretched out to ten days if you wanted. And know that this plan doesn’t include every cenote or Mayan ruins site, but you can add those in too.

First Stop: Puerto Morelos

South of Cancun about forty minutes, this colorful little town is at the start of the Ruta de Cenotes: the Cenotes Road. While it isn’t a resort town, per se, it’s very much centered around tourism and the beach. The town square is just off the beach and it’s surrounded by small hotels and open air restaurants. There is some beautiful street art, plenty of colorful buildings, and a small malecon for strolling

This town is great for a day trip if you’re in the mood to relax and people watch, or if you are looking for a quiet town to escape to for a few days. There are tourists here, but not many. Puerto Morelos feels like the town locals probably visit when they’re having their own beach days…

By Rob Taylor – Full Story at 2TravelDads

Yucatan Gay Travel Resources

Colima: Volcanoes and Pickups – Once Upon a Journey

Author: , July 13th, 2018

Colima - Once Upon a Journey

Mexico, Mexico, Mexico, it’s impossible not to love you. After a week in Guadalajara, we go to Colima where we housesit for three weeks. The first days we are with the two of us, but on day three, a family member joins us for an entire month. Hopefully, we will survive that…

DRIVING THE PICKUP

Who’s that family member?! It’s my sister Denise. It’s already her second time visiting us, first time was for two weeks on Borneo with her boyfriend. Now she’s in Mexico and for a whole month! I pick her up from Guadalajara airport and together we drive to Colima in our badass pick-up truck. To celebrate Denise’s arrival in Mexico we buy a cake and many other delicious foods. In return, Denise brings us Dutch candy, stroopwafels & cheese! We were already looking forward to that for ages.

PUEBLO MÁGICO COMALA

The first exploring we do together is seeing the beautiful magical town Comala. Comala is officially called a magical town – Pueblo Mágico – in Mexico. The government gave 111 towns in Mexico the name magic town to attract more tourists. What’s so special about Comala? All the facades of the buildings are painted white. It’s super cute and pretty.

By Roxanne Weijer – Full Story at Once Upon a Journey

Mexico Gay Travel Resources

 

Colorful Guadalajara, Mexico – Once Upon a Journey

Author: , June 30th, 2018

Mexico - Once Upon a Journey

Hello Mexico! After a three hour flight from Los Angeles, we arrive in Guadalajara: Mexico’s second biggest city. We are super excited to be in Mexico, but also a bit concerned. So many people told us Mexico isn’t safe… But luckily we are two tall girls who already have quite some travel experience and aren’t stupid. Let the Mexico adventures begin!

It’s my first time in Mexico, Maartje’s second time. Not sure if Maartje’s first time counts since she went to Cancun for Spring Break. Not really an authentic part of Mexico, but this time we will see authentic Mexico for sure. We never heard of Guadalajara before, but that’s something we like about a place! That means not so many other tourists go there, or well, let’s see ourselves.

The first nights in Guadalajara we stay with Marco and his dad. We are welcomed with open arms and with lots of Tequila and Corona. I don’t hope this much alcohol is a normal thing in Mexico, wow. With five people we drink three bottles of Tequila in one night. The hangovers are big, but we have lots of fun. And we break our first Pinata ever!! The only thing we see during the first days in Guadalajara is Tlaquepaque, and we LOVE it! It’s so beautiful and colourfull. There are coloured umbrellas and flags in the streets; Maartje is the happiest girl ever. She was already looking for a place with umbrellas like that for a while.

By Roxanne Weijer – Full Story at Once Upon a Journey

Jalisco Gay Travel Resources

Mexico’s Best Yucatan Mayan Ruins – 2TravelDads

Author: , June 15th, 2018

Yucatan Mayan Ruins - 2TravelDads

One of the most cool and unique aspects of touring the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico is the abundance of Mayan ruins. The Mayans were spread all across the Yucatan and down into Belize, Guatemala and beyond. They left behind thousands of small and large structures on the beaches and in the jungles. I spent several days exploring the Yucatan Peninsula and can recommend, what I’m confident are, the four best Mayan ruins sites on the Yucatan and each is completely worth the visit.

Planning your visit to the Yucatan Mayan Ruins

Most people visiting the Yucatan will be staying in one of the larger tourist areas, such as Cancun, Playa del Carmen or Tulum. As you make your decision about where to stay, consider the following activities that you’ll want to be close to: the Yucatan Mayan ruins, beaches, and cenotes.

You’ll find beaches all along the Caribbean side of the Yucatan and most are picture perfect, but to find the perfect spot that puts you close to endless opportunities for exploring ruins and more is tricky. Playa del Carmen is the most centrally located place to stay and there is plenty of fun and wonderful food to be had there, so that’s my top pick for a home base when you’re touring the Peninsula, particularly if you’re planning to visit the best Yucatan ruins.

Tip: I stayed at the Club Yebo Hotel in downtown Playa del Carmen and really enjoyed both the accommodations and the location of the hotel. With kitchenettes and plenty of quiet relaxation space, it’s a great find.

I recommend planning an itinerary that allows you to have ample beach time, including at Akumal where you’re nearly guaranteed to see sea turtles, as well as where you can easily do a day trip to the Mayan ruins of your choice. You’ll find cenotes everywhere, so research which ones you want to visit to be sure you’re not wasting your time at a lame one when you can swim at an awesome cenote.

By Rob Taylor – Full Story at 2TravelDads

Yucatan Gay Travel Resources

Yucatan Mayan Ruins Off The Beaten Path – 2TravelDads

Author: , April 21st, 2018

Yucatan Mayan Ruins at Coba - 2TravelDads

We love all things history and nature. And Mexico. Although we spend the most time in Baja California Sur there’s something truly unique and wonderful about the Yucatan Peninsula and the state of Quintana Roo. In addition to the pristine waters, wildlife and cenotes, the magical attraction of the Yucatan is the concentration of Mayan ruins, and visiting the Coba Ruins is really a special experience, but you need to know how to visit.

The Coba Ruins are by no means the most famous or most popular ruins on the Yucatan, but they are the most awesome to explore, especially the site called Nohoch Mul, the great pyramid. A visit to the Coba Ruins is a lesson in history, an incredible demonstration in nature, and an intense workout. Of the several sites I’ve visited for Mayan Ruins on the Yucatan, the Coba Ruins was, hands down, the best.

Most people visiting the Yucatan Peninsula arrive either via a flight into Cancun (CUN) or via a cruise ship. That’s how I first visited Quintana Roo, was via the Royal Caribbean Oasis of the Seas. Exploring on my own afforded me much more time to break away from the tourist areas and led me to the best off the beaten path Mayan Ruins on the Yucatan: the Coba Ruins.

By Rob & Chris Taylor – Full Story at 2TravelDadsOURCE

Yucatan Gay Travel Resources

Two Days in Cozumel – The Globetrotter Guys

Author: , April 18th, 2018

Cozumel - The Globetrotter Guys

Our friends recommended Cozumel to us, and we are glad they did! Cozumel is a popular stop for cruise ships, and its easy to see why. The island is home to beautiful beaches, dramatic coastlines, adventure activities (including some of the best scuba diving) and some amazing places to eat. Best of all, if time is tight, you can get around the entire island in less than a day! We spent 2 days in Cozumel and here is what we think you should do to make the most of your time! (You can see our short video of all the action here).

Scuba Diving

Home to the start of the second largest coral reef in the world, the great Mesoamerican Barrier Reef, Cozumel is a mecca for scuba diving.
It is well known that Cozumel has beautiful, bright coral, a diverse range of stunning marine life and crystal-clear waters. After our visit, we could not agree more.

Back in 2011 we completed our PADI Open Water qualification in Koa Tao. This meant we could do what is known as a fun dive (your equipment is set up and you just follow the dive master). We completed two dives during our stay and can definitely see why people make a special effort to come here instead of diving from Cancun or Playa del Carmen.

The water truly was crystal clear, you could see straight down to the bottom (about 22m) from the boat. We saw multiple loggerhead turtles, lionfish, beautifully coloured parrot fish, and most exciting of all, 3 eagle rays.

Full Story at The Globetrotter Guys

Yucatan Gay Travel Resources