Mexico’s Best Yucatan Mayan Ruins – 2TravelDads

Author: , June 15th, 2018

Yucatan Mayan Ruins - 2TravelDads

One of the most cool and unique aspects of touring the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico is the abundance of Mayan ruins. The Mayans were spread all across the Yucatan and down into Belize, Guatemala and beyond. They left behind thousands of small and large structures on the beaches and in the jungles. I spent several days exploring the Yucatan Peninsula and can recommend, what I’m confident are, the four best Mayan ruins sites on the Yucatan and each is completely worth the visit.

Planning your visit to the Yucatan Mayan Ruins

Most people visiting the Yucatan will be staying in one of the larger tourist areas, such as Cancun, Playa del Carmen or Tulum. As you make your decision about where to stay, consider the following activities that you’ll want to be close to: the Yucatan Mayan ruins, beaches, and cenotes.

You’ll find beaches all along the Caribbean side of the Yucatan and most are picture perfect, but to find the perfect spot that puts you close to endless opportunities for exploring ruins and more is tricky. Playa del Carmen is the most centrally located place to stay and there is plenty of fun and wonderful food to be had there, so that’s my top pick for a home base when you’re touring the Peninsula, particularly if you’re planning to visit the best Yucatan ruins.

Tip: I stayed at the Club Yebo Hotel in downtown Playa del Carmen and really enjoyed both the accommodations and the location of the hotel. With kitchenettes and plenty of quiet relaxation space, it’s a great find.

I recommend planning an itinerary that allows you to have ample beach time, including at Akumal where you’re nearly guaranteed to see sea turtles, as well as where you can easily do a day trip to the Mayan ruins of your choice. You’ll find cenotes everywhere, so research which ones you want to visit to be sure you’re not wasting your time at a lame one when you can swim at an awesome cenote.

By Rob Taylor – Full Story at 2TravelDads

Yucatan Gay Travel Resources

Visiting the Mayan Ruins

Author: , March 23rd, 2012

Mayan RuinsMarch 20, the spring equinox, marks the first major date of 2012 for the Maya Long Count calendar. The hype has already caused a bump in tourism at many already-popular sites throughout the Mundo Maya, but with a little advance planning, you can carve out some solitude (and preserve your sanity) while contemplating the enduring mysteries of the Maya civilization at their remarkable ruins.

While visiting the sites of Chichen Itza, Coba and Tulum in the Riviera Maya, I was fortunate enough to have access to Dr. Julia Miller, an archeologist specializing in Maya culture and architecture and tour guide for the Merida-based operator Catherwood Travels. Below, a rundown of some of Miller’s input from my incessant questions, as well as some practical tips on how to maximize your visit to the Mundo Maya.

Ask about group size before you book. Go with as small a group as possible, especially at larger sites like Chichen Itza. Ask before booking about maximum numbers, as well as the guide-to-guest ratio. Otherwise, you may find yourself straining to hear anything at the back of a screeching horde of clueless tourists wearing fanny packs and even bathing suits.

Full Story from Sherman’s Travel

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Mayan Ruins in Mexico

Author: , March 16th, 2012

Mayan PyramidHaving just returned from visiting three prominent Maya ruins in Mexico – Chichen Itza, Tulum, and Coba – I can confirm firsthand that the buzz over 2012, which marks the end of the Maya Long Count calendar, is heating up, at least in the Riviera Maya.

As they are across the Mundo Maya, which also include the countries of Belize, Honduras, and Guatemala, tourism numbers are up at these prominent sites, each of which offers a distinct, unique feel. Still, even with bigger than normal crowds, these remarkable destinations are well worth the trip, whether you’re a Mayaphile (which I am quickly turning into) or not. And after a long day of exploring, a refreshing dip in a cenote, or natural well – the Riviera Maya is full of them – is the perfect way to cool off.

In addition, the Riviera Maya is also becoming a popular adventure travel destination, with an array of opportunities for hiking, diving, and cave exploration. One word of advice: If you’re thinking about a visit in 2012, book now.

Full Story from Sherman’s Travel

Click here for gay travel resources in Mexico.