Gay Life in Mexico – The Nomadic Boys

Author: , July 25th, 2019

Gay life in Mexico - The Nomadic Boys

There was a time when the number 41 was considered very bad luck in Mexico. The Army used to leave the number 41 out of battalions, and in hospital/hotel rooms, Room #41 would just be skipped out entirely. It was so bad that some people would even skip out their 41st birthday completely!

Why?

This innocuous number became synonymous with Mexican queer culture in the early 1900s following a raid on a private party by police on 17th November 1901. At this party, there were 41 men: 22 dressed as men, 19 as women. There was, in fact, a 42nd person in attendance: Ignacio de la Torre, who was President Porfirio Díaz’s son-in-law. Whilst the police allowed Ignacio to escape, they arrested the remaining 41, beat them, jailed them, convicted them, then later conscripted them into the army as punishment. This became a massive scandal in Mexican society and became known as “The Dance of the 41” (“Baile de los 41”).

Whilst homosexuality was legalised in Mexico as far back as 1871, society remained so hostile to homosexuality that this scandal led to the vilification of the number 41. Calling someone 41 was akin to saying they were queer.

Full Story at The Nomadic Boys

Mexico Gay Travel Resources

 

South Africa Gay Life – The Globetrotter Guys

Author: , June 21st, 2019

South Africa Gay Life - The Globetrotter Guys

South Africa is one of the most incredible places we have ever visited. We are always looking to travel to gay friendly destinations that offer both luxury and adventure and South Africa ticks all these boxes.

Some of you reading may find it surprising that South Africa is considered to be a gay friendly destination. Speaking from our own experience, we had no idea until we travelled here back in 2015. The same view seems to be true for many of you that have taken part in polls we have run on social media.

Whilst our experience here as tourists has been great, we know that this is not always the case for the local LGBT community. And so during our three months in South Africa, we made it our mission to find out what South Africa Gay Life is really like as a local LGBT person.

And who better to speak to than Mr Gay South Africa 2019 himself, Chris Emmanuel! We were lucky enough to meet with Chris during our stay in Knysna. Here is what he has to say about gay South Africa:

Hi Chris! Please introduce yourself to our readers, and of course tell us all about the Mr Gay World Competition, how you came to be Mr Gay South Africa, and what you hope to achieve for the country.

Hi everyone! I’m Chris Emmanuel, the recently crowned Mr Gay South Africa 2019.

I’m a ripe 42 years old and it was with total surprise that I won by public participation voting and became the new Mr Gay South Africa. Following being crowned Mr Gay South Africa, I am setting a goal of raising over R1 million ($70,000) for issues and charities.

Here in South Africa, we are very lucky to have an incredible constitution that strongly protects gay rights and marriage.

By Sion and ben – Full Story at The Globetrotter Guys

South Africa Gay Travel Resources

Taiwan Gay Life – The Nomadic Boys

Author: , May 29th, 2019

Taiwan Gay Life - The Nomadic Boys

Taiwan has become one of the most gay friendly places in Asia. On a continent famous for not having the most progressive LGBTQ rights, Taiwan is proudly paving the way forward. It has long been a gay trailblazer, famous for having progressive LGBTQ laws, the largest pride in Asia and even a God devoted to homosexual love with his own temple in New Taipei City.

In May 2019, Taiwan made history by becoming the first nation in Asia to implement gay marriages. This is immense!

Nowhere else in Asia comes close to this achievement. For example, whilst other gay friendly places in Asia like Thailand, Cambodia, Japan, Hong Kong, Nepal and the Philippines may have started discussing the implementation of gay civil union laws (if at all!), no one else has even touched the realm of recognising same sex marriages. Except Taiwan!

Of course the same sex marriage laws of Taiwan are not without difficulties, having had quite a bumpy road to get to where they are. Despite this, it is an incredible achievement not only for Taiwan’s gay community, but also for the entire LGBTQ community across Asia.

So what is it about Taiwan that makes it so gay friendly? We met with local boy Po-Hung from Kaohsiung who was also Mr Gay Taiwan 2018. Po-Hung gave us the full lowdown about Taiwan gay life, what it’s like growing up gay here and other invaluable local tips.

By Stefan Arestis – Full Story at The Nomadic Boys

Life in Gay Peru – The Nomadic Boys

Author: , February 15th, 2017

Gay Peru - Nomadic Boys

“A man who rides Peruvian paso horses is referred to as a “chalan” – not to be confused with a “chalon” – that’s Peruvian gay slang for a guy with a huge dick!”

Our Peruvian buddy Aaron from Lima is always keen to show off the highlights of his country.

Tourism in gay Peru has exploded over the past decade and alongside this, it has been one of the world’s fastest growing economies. Peru has historically been a very conservative society and quite hostile to its LGBT community.

For example, there are no laws in place for gay couples to enter into civil unions, let alone gay marriage. On top of that, laws meant to protect public morals are often used against gays and lesbians: a protest called Kisses Against Homophobia over the Valentine’s weekend in 2016 was brutally and violently interrupted by the police showing the government’s lack of progress in protecting its LGBT Peruvians.

However, fast forward a year and there is hope for change. More Peruvian politicians are slowly coming out to support the LGBT community. The Civil Union bill was reintroduced into Congress in late November 2016 with strong backing from President Kuczynski.

Then in January 2017, the same President issued a decree prohibiting all forms of discrimination and hate crimes on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. Very slowly, Peru is evolving and getting ready to take her place in the pink limelight.

By Stefan Arestis – Full Story at the Nomadic Boys

Peru Gay Travel Resources

Gay Life in Ecuador – The Nomadic Boys

Author: , January 26th, 2017

Gay Ecuador

The gay scene in Quito is a lot of fun with a handful of gay bars and discos. But compared to other cities across Latin America like Buenos Aires and Montevideo, we noticed the crowd was largely quite young in comparison. No bear culture here for example…where do all the over 40s hang out?

Ecuador has this weird extreme mix of the very conservative older generation versus the more forward thinking, confident and liberal minded millennials.

It makes sense when you look at the dramatic change in LGBT legislation over the last 20 years. Until 1997, gay life in Ecuador was tough: it was an extremely conservative country, on par with places like Sri Lanka, India or Indonesia where just being caught in a gay bar could get you in trouble with the police.

In 1997, the constitution was changed introducing some of the most progressive gay friendly legislation in the world. For example, full anti-discrimination laws on grounds of sexual orientation were introduced. In the UK we had to wait until 2003 when the equivalent law was passed and in the USA, there is still no federal law outlawing discrimination nationwide.

By Stefan Arestis – Full Story at the Nomadic Boys

Ecuador Gay Travel Resources

Life in Gay Uruguay – Nomadic Boys

Author: , December 10th, 2016

gay Uruguay - Nomadic Boys

What’s the first country that comes to mind when you think of tango? We’re guessing Argentina, right?

You’d be half right. Back in the 1880s, the tango was invented by the urban lower classes in the Rio de la Plata basin, which includes both Buenos Aires and Montevideo.

As such, both Argentina and Uruguay claim equal ownership of the tango. In 2009, they made a successful joint application to have tango listed in the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage List.

We attended the Uruguayan LGBT Chamber of Commerce conference in September 2016, where tango was showcased. To our surprise, two extremely handsome gay Uruguay boys, Juan and Rodrigo, took to the stage and blew us away.

By Stefan Arestis – Full Story at the Nomadic Boys

Uruguay Gay Travel Resources

Gay Life in Indonesia – Nomadic Boys

Author: , January 18th, 2016

Nomadic Boys

“OMG careful you don’t get caned for being gay over there you two!”

We did of course point out to our concerned friends and family back home that Sharia Law is only in place in one small part of Indonesia in the Northern Aceh province. If the rainbow flag gets out of control in Aceh, you risk being convicted by the Sharia police to 10-150 lashes in public for being gay.

And yes, this now applies to foreigners too!

But we don’t go around waving rainbow flags. Nor do we have any interest in getting publicly canned in Aceh (our caning adventures at the Komodo National Park were more then enough)…

By Stefan Arestis – Full Story at the Nomadic Boys

Indonesia Gay Travel Resources

Nomadic Boys – Gay Life in Yangon, Myanmar

Author: , March 8th, 2015

Gay Life in Myanmar - Nomadic BoysMyanmar is a very conservative and religious country with around 89% of the population practising Buddhism. In addition, it has retained the old colonial homophobic laws inherited from the British Empire.

Whilst Queen Elizabeth in the UK recently “signed” gay marriages into law, 150 years ago, Queen Victoria oversaw section 377 of the 1860 Penal Code being passed into law, which criminalised sodomy with up to 10 years imprisonment and a fine.

Although section 377 remains today (like similar laws in India and Sri Lanka), we couldn’t find any recent enforcement of it. Since 2010, the military government of Myanmar has made sweeping political reforms which opened up the country more, particularly press censorship.

Full Story at The Nomadic Boys | Myanmar Gay Travel Resources

Gays in Havana

Author: , June 7th, 2014

Gays in Havana - Alain the Sojourner

Cuba, I reckon, would be the next gay destination. It’s a gay-friendly country and bisexuals abound. It’s safe, too. I was told that “straight” men do it for the money, out of their jobless situation. Life in Cuba is hard, so can you blame them? Find a job? What job? Though education in Cuba is free but many university graduates couldn’t find one. But, don’t ever think everyone there can be bought. Nice people are everywhere.

In Old Havana, I was followed four times by four different men who have gaydar more functional than mine. It turned out all of them were not gays. They don’t even call themselves bisexuals. They’re still straight, they believe. According to one, “I’m not gay. I’m top”. I was appalled at the brutal frankness of their approach. They didn’t beat around the bush. After exchanging niceties, they asked me what I wanted and they named their price (write me in a comment below if you wanna know).

By Alain – Full Story at The Sojourner | Cuba Gay Travel Resources

Gay Life in Israel

Author: , March 2nd, 2011

Gay Tel AvivEditor’s note: This is an excerpt from a story orginated on Haaretz.com in Israel.

The crowding in the fast-food place where Amit (not his real name ) recounts his life story does not calm his fears that someone might eavesdrop on our conversation. But the tall man in his 30s, wearing a big knitted skullcap in a distinctly Hardal (ultra-Orthodox Zionist ) style, proceeds to talk freely about his sexual proclivities and his god. Before sitting down, like a good yeshiva boy he asks the waiter where he can perform the ritual hand-washing, and whether there is a special cup available for that purpose.

Amit is a gay man in a society that believes homosexuality is, as he puts it, “avi avot hatuma” (literally, “the grandfather of all impurity”). For the past 20 years many local religious gays have slaughtered sacred cows and demanded to be recognized and accepted by their community. Amit is also demanding this and toward that end has even founded a new organization for people like him, an Internet-based support group called Kamoha – Orthodox Homosexuals.

However, in contrast to other religious gays, he does not necessarily advocate coming out. Quite the contrary: He seeks rabbinic permission for many of the steps he and other gays are taking, including engaging in a relationship. He is now waiting for a rabbinic decision that could enable him and others like him to establish a family.

Full Story from GayTravel.com

Click here for gay travel resources in Israel.