The Oculus in New York City – Keep Calm and Wander

Author: , June 29th, 2018

The Oculus in New York City - Keep Calm and Wander

The Oculus in New York City (or the World Trade Center) serves as a terminal station that is, in turn, served by the Newark WTC and the Hoboken WTC, where the latter serves only on weekends.

The station, which is located in the WTC of the Financial District, Manhattan, itself was opened for public on March 3, 2016, after replacing the temporary station that had been placed after the gruesome attacks of 9/11.

Although there have been many controversies attached to the station, savor the facts below that only a few people know. These facts are meant to present a separate image of the station.

1. The Steel Used is Unique

Since the projects of the architect Santiago Calatrava are known for their unique curves, only a special type of steel can withstand them. The Oculus is made with the same special steel that is manufactured by only four companies in the world. The Italian and the Spanish companies out of these four were capable to deliver the kind of steel required for Oculus.

By Alain – Full Story at Keep Calm and Wander

Oscar Wilde Tours – New York Gay Tour Operator

Author: , March 17th, 2018

Oscar Wilde Tours

Luxury guided tours focused on gay history. Exclusive experiences, including visits to places normally closed to the public and lectures by prominent gay authors and performers. Our 2014 tour follows Oscar Wilde’s life from Dublin to Paris. Gay Italy in 2015, Greece in 2016.

Oscar Wilde’s London and Paris 2018 – England, London: The Chesterfield Mayfair, 35 Charles St.

When: Custom Website: Click Here

This 9 day tour includes 4 nights in each city. See London and Paris a whole new way: these are not only Europe’s two great metropolises, they are also its two great *gay* metropolises. From Shakespeare to Stephen Fry, King Henri III to Yves St.-Laurent, gay people have had a huge role in both cities’ histories and cultures.
Let gay historian Dr. Andrew Lear and his staff of gay guides show you both cities from the gay perspective. We will have walking tours of neighborhoods with key roles in gay history, such as Bloomsbury and the Marais; gay tours of monuments and museums, such as the National Portrait Gallery and the Louvre; and excursions to places with fascinating gay histories, such as the Castle of Chenonceau and Bletchley Park, where gay hero Alan Turing broke the Nazi’s secret codes, helping to save the Western World.

A trip which combines fun, learning, and pride. Top-level 4 star hotels, excellent (often historic) restaurants: 8 breakfasts, 4 lunches, 1 tea, 1 dinner.

See the Oscar Wilde Tours Expanded Listing on Purple Roofs Here

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The Rebirth of Manhattan – Gay Star News

Author: , December 2nd, 2017

Manhattan - pixabay

New York City’s downtown and financial district is changing: As it inevitably would.

No one who witnessed them can forget the events of 9/11. Since that time, the area around the former World Trade Center towers has been scarred. Sixteen years on, that scar has gone some way to healing.

One World Trade Center

I first came to New York in 2002, just six months after 9/11. The WTC site was still a closed-off scene of devastation. I’ve returned every 2-3 years since. The development and rebirth has been dramatic, but moreso in the last couple of years.

New Yorkers know that life has to move on. The downtown financial district now stands in the shadows of another tower – the new One World Trade Center. The highest building in the Western hemisphere, since its opening in 2014 changes to the local area have picked up speed.

The residential population in Lower Manhattan has more than doubled since 9/11. Some big banking groups have moved out since the financial crash of 2008: all those new residents, and visitors, need places to eat, drink and shop.

By David Hudson – Full Story at Gay Star News

Manhattan Gay Travel Resources

Manhattan Day Trip – Dolly Travels

Author: , November 25th, 2017

Manhattan Day Trips - Dolly Travels

I love to travel…everyone who knows me, knows that. How has it happened that I had never visited New York City?

Well, yesterday (Thursday, November 9), I got to enjoy a day in the Big City.

Frank and I are staying at a hotel on Long Island, as that is where all the activities around the Cradle of Aviation and the gala on Saturday night are happening.

From the advice of the hotel people and our new friends from the Museum, we took a taxi to the Westbury Station; one of the stations of the Long Island Rail Road. The train trip took about 45 minutes, letting us out at Penn Station in Downtown Manhattan.

When we emerged from the train, I was amazed at how large Penn Station is. All those trains carrying people to all the boroughs of New York. We exited the station right into the thick of things..panhandlers, myriad salespeople for the different bus trips, boat trips, different activities in the city. The tall buildings and moving billboards on the buildings. We walked along 7th Avenue, with me, looking at everything, just like a kid.

Crossing that first intersection, I had a good view of the Empire State Building. We debated about going up to the top of that building, since it was only two blocks away, but decided against that, as we had tickets for a matinee performance at one of the theaters near Broadway.

The weather was a bit nippy, but tolerable. I enjoyed the walk, seeing all the tall buildings, the Macy’s store that took up an entire block.

Who needs a newspaper? Just sit at a table in Times Square and read the news in Large Print.

Finally, we stopped for lunch at a restaurant near the theater. We had planned to have dinner later, after the performance. I just enjoyed “people watching” along the way.

We arrived at the Majestic Theater in plenty of time to find our places.

We had very good seats. This was the only photo I got of the stage. Soon, the cell phone police (the ushers) came along, pointing at cell phone offenders, to ensure that no one would photograph any of the actors or scenes.

The production was amazingly wonderful. The voices of the actors, the stage settings, all were magnificent, where we felt transported to that opera theater in Paris all those years ago.

Now, Frank and I both have the music still running through our heads.

“Just love me, that’s all I ask of you.” Or, “Music of the NIght”. Now you can have the music running through your heads, also.

All in all, it was a very enjoyable day. When we got back to Penn Station, night had fallen, but the city was definitely not dark.

That was my day in Manhattan. It was certainly a day I will remember.

Now we are back on Long Island, and we will be going to the Gala dinner and reception at the “Cradle of Aviation Museum” this evening.

I will tell you about that tomorrow.

Until then,
Ciao for now,
Dolly

Checking Out Manhattan Bridge – Keep Calm and Wander

Author: , September 6th, 2017

Manhattan Bridge

I finally visited Manhattan Bridge up close. I’ve been coming to New York for 6 years in a row every summer but I haven’t been to this bridge. Well, the bridge itself is not really a must-see destination in your guidebook. Manhattan Bridge is just the another bridge in New York that only few dare to wander. I came here because I wanted to check out Dumbo, a neighbourhood that’s becoming popular for foodies. I went around looking for a perfect place to sit and admire Manhattan’s skyline across the river but my search was in vain. Ok, I found one restaurant but the view wasn’t enough for me. If I had to spend much money, I want a good view, too, not just good food, right? So, I ended up reading a book at Brooklyn Park, suppressing and forgetting my hunger.

I think I’ll have to go back there and explore the area longer. or I’ll do my research first before going back.

How to Get There

There are five subway trains that go there: lines D, N, Q, B, and R. Get off at DeKalb Avenue. It’s a pretty long walk to Dumbo / Manhattan Bridge.

For first timers in New York City, I’d suggest that you take lines A and C. Get off at High Street. Explore Brooklyn Bridge first and then walk to Manhattan Bridge and Dumbo.

By Alain – Full Story at Keep Calm and Wander

New York City Gay Travel Resources

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New York Queer Clubs and Bars

Author: , September 3rd, 2017

New York Queer Clubs - the Toolbox

The City that Never Sleeps has plenty of time for nightlife, and the New York queer clubs scene is one of the most prominent in the United States. After all, the Stonewall Inn — a Greenwich Village tavern that was the epicenter of the 1969 Stonewall riots — recently became the country’s first LGBT national monument.

Whether your idea of an amazing night out includes Broadway-worthy singalongs or crowded ragers, there are a number of excellent gay bars and clubs in New York City to check out. Get to know the local LGBT community at one of these eight spots — and don’t forget your dancing cowboy shoes.

For the Dancing: Industry

Grab a drink at the bar and make your way through the crowds to Industry’s dance floor in the back. The DJs at this Hell’s Kitchen club blast up-tempo, Top 40 hits and throwbacks to keep people dancing through the night.

For the Broadway Fans: Marie’s Crisis

Come to Marie’s Crisis and sing along with an amicable troupe of musical lovers regardless of sexual orientation. The skilled pianists at this low-ceilinged West Village basement bar play classics by Sondheim, Lloyd Webber, and Gershwin, while patrons harmonize. Don’t be surprised if you spot a celebrity belting out The Little Mermaid in the crowd: A-listers are no stranger here.

By Peter Schlesinger – Full Story at Travel+Leisure

New York City Gay Travel Resources

Governor’s Island, New York – Keep Calm and Wander

Author: , September 3rd, 2017

Governor's Island New York - Alain

Governor’s Island is just yards away from downtown Manhattan. The island, however, doesn’t have people in residence. In fact, it’s only open to the public from May 1 – October 31.

What to do at Governor’s Island

  • During the summer, there are arts festivals, concerts, performances and guided tours.
  • You can rent a bike and go around the island.
  • If you’re up for walking, you can also do it, too. You should be done strolling in two hours or less, depends how long you’d stop for selfies.
  • The island also has food carts. Don’t worry about getting hungry there. And oh yeah, you can do your picnic there, too!
  • Visit museums and castles.
  • Get a drink at Oyster Bar where the view of New York Skyline is right before you, unobstructed.

How to get to Governor’s Island. The easiest way to get there is to take a ferry from Maritime Building on 10 South Street. It’s right next to (on the left) the South Ferry Terminal. You can’t miss it.

By Alain – Full Story at KepmCalm and Wander

New York City Gay Travel Resources

A Day in Brooklyn – Globetrotter Girls

Author: , August 19th, 2017

lesbian Brooklyn

It wasn’t Manhattan that made me fall for New York – it was Brooklyn that made me fall in love with the ‘Big Apple’. I had been to New York several times but it was in 2013, when I lived in Brooklyn for two months, that I fell so hard for the city that I decided I had to live in New York at some point in my life. While I had always enjoyed New York City tremendously on previous visits, it never felt like a place I’d want to call home – until the summer I spent in Brooklyn.

And since then, not only have I made Brooklyn my home, but I’ve also spent countless months exploring this massive borough, and I’ve come to the conclusion that I’ll never be done exploring it – because there are so many different neighborhoods to see, cool spots to stumble upon and hidden gems to discover.

Over the past few years, I’ve made it a point to introduce everyone who comes to visit me in New York to Brooklyn. Sure, I get it: Manhattan is still the biggest draw for 99% of people who come to NYC, but I feel like they’re missing out on such a big part of the city when they never leave that tiny island – they should at least add a couple of stops outside of Manhattan to their itinerary. Plus: There are plenty of cheap places to stay in Brooklyn – if you are familiar with Manhattan hotel prices, you know what I’m talking about.

I’ve started to run Brooklyn tours this year which I hope I’ll be able to launch on a larger scale later this year, but for now, let me take you on a virtual tour of Brooklyn and tell you all of the reasons why it’s well worth venturing into Brooklyn for a day while you’re visiting New York.

By Dani – Full Story at Globetrotter Girls

Brooklyn Gay Travel Resources

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A New York Sunset – Globetrotter Girls

Author: , June 1st, 2017

New York Sunset

Another busy week is coming to an end! This week, I’ve had the pleasure to add ‘serious’ room hunting to my to-do-list (as opposed to ‘casual’ room hunting the week before).

Had I not challenged myself to daily runs this month, I don’t think I’d seen much of the city in the past seven days, but these four miles a day allowed me to remember that I am in my favorite city in the world. I deliberately chose scenic running routes this week to remind me in what a stunning city I live: Bridge runs over the Brooklyn Bridge and the Manhattan Bridge, the Prospect Park loop, and runs through some of my favorite picturesque neighborhoods, like Fort Greene and Bed-Stuy, with their beautiful brownstones.

I had to pinch myself sometimes, thinking to myself ‘I can’t believe I am living here now‘, and indulged in reading a few of my first posts about my love for New York, and how I’d been trying to figure out to spend more time here ever since my first full summer in 2014. First my extended visa, now permanent residency.. sometimes I still can’t believe that this is really happening. I’ll be reminiscing some more about how I got here in my Life Lately round-up.

By Dani – Full Story at Globetrotter Girls

New York City Gay Travel Resources

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New Map of New York City’s Historic Queer Sites

Author: , May 26th, 2017

New York City Queer History

The NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project has produced an interactive map featuring their work to exhaustively identify and document sites in New York City pivotal to LGBT history. The project’s founders, Andrew Dolkart, Ken Lustbader, and Jay Shockley, have spent 25 years in research and advocacy and sought to contextualize events and places that had an impact on LGBT lives and progress.

Including sites such as Christine Jorgensen‘s childhood home to Julio Rivera Corner to pre-Stonewall activist gathering spaces, the Project officially began in August 2015 and actively seeks input from members of the community for suggestions and feedback. They described their mission to local NYC site DNAInfo:

Of the 92,000 sites on the National Register of Historic Places, about a dozen are listed for their association with LGBT history.

The historic sites project hopes to change that.

Full Story at Towleroad.com