Wandering Wives – L Beach 2016

Author: , April 29th, 2016

L Beach 2016 Wandering Wives

We’ve just returned from a crazy weekend of pool parties, live music, breathable waterproofs, DJ’s and bracing sea air on the Baltic Coast. L Beach is an annual festival now in its seventh year, which brings together around 4000 women in the German resort of Weissenhauser Strand. We didn’t really know what to expect when we arrived at L Beach 2016, aside from the sound of 4000 pairs of comfortable shoes dancing until dawn. We love live music but we weren’t familiar with many of the musicians who were playing. We decided to go with the flow and see as many acts as possible, we had an amazing time and are pleased to say we were blown away by the range of talent at L Beach. We genuinely loved all of these artists and will be updating our music collection immediately. Here are Wandering Wives top five live performances from L Beach 2016:

5. Chefboss
Chefboss were a great surprise for us, we never planned to watch their gig but we are so glad we did. German hip hop doesn’t usually feature that highly on our list of favourite music genres, but the Chefboss chicks brought so much energy to their performance we were jumping around with the crowd and begging for more! It didn’t matter that we couldn’t understand the words to the songs, we were carried along in a wave of excitement and loved every minute of it. They beat some great English speaking acts to a place in our top five live performances at L Beach with their awesome stage presence and enthusiasm. With their team of hot dancers wearing wrestling masks, they not only owned the stage but the whole festival. There is only one word to describe the Chefboss crew: Fierce!…read more on Wandering Wives

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The Queer Charms of Hamburg, Germany: 5 Picks for the Gay Traveler

Author: , October 14th, 2015

Hamburg, GermanyLike all sophisticates, Hamburg doesn’t reveal all its charms at once. It’s a city whose many pleasures take time to discover. Both ancient and modern, its history continues to be shaped by the sea around it, a port city whose wealth and strategic location have created a city of great beauty, tolerance and a healthy dose of attitude.

Hamburg shares a reserved countenance with its Scandinavian neighbors. Its style is decidedly less flashy than Munich, its counterpart in southern Germany. While showy displays of wealth are expected in the Bavarian capital, Hamburg’s old-money demeanor is marked by understatement. Hamburg is less wild than Berlin, Germany’s nightlife capital, but don’t mistake that for prudishness: The Hamburgers may have less free time on their hands, but the Reeperbahn in the St. Pauli neighborhood is one of Germany’s best known red-light districts, and still home to both the pleasures of the flesh and the free-wheeling acceptance that is common among port cities.

Hamburg is an unlikely tourist destination, without the fairytale castles of Germany’s south and east, or Berlin’s party scene. Its natives are often criticized for being elitist and reserved. But we found the city to be warm and welcoming, easily navigated, filled with cultural, culinary and architectural highlights, and much less encumbered by the usual throng of annoying Euro tourists.

By Ed Salvato – Full Story at Towleroad.com | Germany Gay Travel Resources

Five Reasons to Travel in Germany

Author: , April 16th, 2014

Skyline looking out over Werder, Germany

Photo by Adam Groffman

This past weekend you may have noticed on my Instagram @travelsofadam that I’ve been traveling around Germany. This country is one of my favorites in Europe for a few reasons. Perhaps that’s not unexpected, considering that I live in Berlin. But seeing as how this is my adopted home, I didn’t always have a fascination for German history and culture. Over the years of living here, though, I’ve become more and more fascinated by Germany’s unique place in the world.

You see, I’ve gotten to know this country quite well. Even though I’m a city boy through and through, my desire to see more of Germany is fueled by my interest to live here. Being an expat living in Berlin, I feel a special pull toward seeing more of my new adopted country than most other European destinations. Thankfully, Germany has some great sites to offer up.

This weekend I left Berlin and headed south on a “Visionaries and Pioneering Thinker’s Route” to see and learn more about Germany’s innovative history. That includes sites such as the Lutherstadt where Martin Luther pinned his 95 Theses on a church door, starting the Protestant Reformation. And also the cities of Weimar and Dessau which is where the Bauhaus school of art & design began (soooo cool!). Along the way I’ll stop off at the major UNESCO sites (a handy guide as I only have a day in each city) using this free app and Germany’s official UNESCO guide.

Authored by Adam Groffman. See the Full Story at Travels of Adam here.

See Adam’s full blog here.

Click here for gay travel resources in Germany.

What’s New in Hamburg, Germany

Author: , February 7th, 2014

Hamburg, Germany

Apple Maps

When it comes to European travel, Hamburg often plays second fiddle to its cooler neighbor to the east, Berlin. But Germany’s second city is no second-tier destination – and this year, it’s pulling out the stops to prove it.

With the 50th anniversary of the British Invasion approaching, and the two remaining members of the Beatles having just made a rare joint appearance at the Grammys, Beatlemania is simmering once again. Besides New York, where they played their first U.S. show on February 7, 1964, Hamburg is also inextricably linked to the history of the band: between 1960 and 1962. They played many of their first concerts there.

This year, though, Hamburg will be honoring a different musician, Carl Philip Emanuel Bach, and the 300th anniversary of his birth, with a concert at St. Michael’s Church on March 8. But that doesn’t mean that Germany’s second-largest city is looking only to the past. Here are some exciting new developments to look forward to this year…

Authored By Karen Gardiner Dion – See the Full Story at Sherman’s Travel

Click here for gay travel resources in Germany.

Exploring Hamburg, Germany

Author: , September 5th, 2013

Germany - Google Maps

from Google Maps

Hamburg is a city without sights. Or should I write, “sights,” for there’s a lot to see in Germany’s bustling second-biggest city. There just aren’t a lot of landmarks for the tourist. Which makes it simultaneously challenging and rewarding: while there’s a lot to do in this fun and liberal city, from great museums and fabulous dining to strolls along the many bodies of water that run through town, there isn’t a conveniently charming old town, a castle from which to anchor your ramblings, or a series of world-heritage monuments for your “must do” list.

Instead, you get this sort of crescent with the two gayest areas, St. Georg and St. Pauli, at either tip, and a lot of amazement in-between. Just start walking: there are about a million fascinating streets to stroll down, lined with the galleries and boutiques by young designers, fabulous restaurants, and, most importantly, a sense of life, an open-mindedness and welcoming air that comes from being a great shipping city and always open to the world.

A member of the Hanseatic League of merchants, Hamburg was always in a position to thrive. It’s a wealthy city, and this is reflected in its lifestyle, devoted to enjoyment. It’s also one of Europe’s greenest cities, and the River Elbe and Alster Lake add to its livability. It’s the same size as Singapore but has one-third the population. It has the same number of people as Vienna, but twice the area. You get the point.

Authored By Rich Rubin – See the Full Story at Passport Magazine

Click here for gay travel resources in Germany.

Visiting Hamburg, Germany

Author: , July 24th, 2013

Hamburg - Apple Maps

from Apple Maps

Hamburg is a city without sights. Or should I write, “sights,” for there’s a lot to see in Germany’s bustling second-biggest city. There just aren’t a lot of landmarks for the tourist. Which makes it simultaneously challenging and rewarding: while there’s a lot to do in this fun and liberal city, from great museums and fabulous dining to strolls along the many bodies of water that run through town, there isn’t a conveniently charming old town, a castle from which to anchor your ramblings, or a series of world-heritage monuments for your “must do” list.

Instead, you get this sort of crescent with the two gayest areas, St. Georg and St. Pauli, at either tip, and a lot of amazement in-between. Just start walking: there are about a million fascinating streets to stroll down, lined with the galleries and boutiques by young designers, fabulous restaurants, and, most importantly, a sense of life, an open-mindedness and welcoming air that comes from being a great shipping city and always open to the world.

A member of the Hanseatic League of merchants, Hamburg was always in a position to thrive. It’s a wealthy city, and this is reflected in its lifestyle, devoted to enjoyment. It’s also one of Europe’s greenest cities, and the River Elbe and Alster Lake add to its livability. It’s the same size as Singapore but has one-third the population. It has the same number of people as Vienna, but twice the area. You get the point.

Authored By Rich Rubin – See the Full Story at Past Magazine

Click here for gay travel resource in Germany.