Gay Taipei’s a Foodie Paradise – Mic.com

Author: , December 12th, 2018

gay taipei - crab - pixabay

If your idea of vacation planning is obsessively researching every restaurant, bar, coffee shop and food stand, gay Taipei, Taiwan, belongs on your bucket list. Taiwan’s sprawling capital city is home to 2.7 million residents and what feels like just as many must-visit spots for food and drink.

The island has a contentious history, with bouts of Dutch, Spanish, Japanese and Chinese presence or rule, and Taipei’s rich culinary landscape includes nods to its diverse colonial past as well as the traditions of the indigenous population: fresh Japanese seafood at DOZO Izakaya Bar, superstar soup dumplings at Din Tai Fung, fine-dining French exports like L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon, unbelievable street food like stinky tofu, innovative cocktails from the R&D Cocktail Lab, German beer halls like Buckskin Beerhouse, scenic tea houses atop Maokong mountain — and that barely scratches the surface.

There’s never been a better time to visit. In the first Michelin Guide Taipei, the city had 20 restaurants receive stars, with restaurants ranging from the three-star Le Palais, famous for its expertly executed Cantonese fare, to the one-star Taiwanese-meets-Nordic hit Mume.

Thirty-six joints made Michelin’s Bib Gourmand category, including 10 street food stalls scattered throughout the Taipei’s famous night markets, where tourists, locals and everyone in between sample piping-hot black pepper buns and pearl milk tea. You’ll also find plenty of excellent shops, hotels and tourist attractions — Taipei 101, once the world’s tallest building, is definitely worth braving the crowds for — to fill time between meals.

By Meredith Heil – Full Story at Mic.com

Gay Taipei & Tainan

Author: , March 2nd, 2016

W Taipei - gay Taipei

Not so long ago, the label “Made in Taiwan” inferred mass-produced products that were made quickly, sold cheaply, and exported globally–typical fodder for our throwaway society. Then Taiwan made a seismic shift away from cheap, labor-intensive things like toys and textiles, to become the world’s biggest manufacturer of notebook computers.

A report in 2013 estimated that 89% of the world’s notebooks and 46% of desktop PCs were manufactured by Taiwanese companies, with global brands like Apple, Dell, Hewlett-Packard, and Lenovo utilizing Taiwan’s technological and creative talents. Taiwanese brands such as Acer, ASUS, and smartphone manufacturer HTC have also become major players.

This change isn’t restricted to hi-tech industries. Taipei, the capital city, has been named World Design Capital for 2016 by the ICSID (International Council of Societies of Industrial Design), a great honor for Taiwan’s growing design scene.

Amid the gleaming architecture of Taipei’s Xinyi financial district, a historic tobacco factory built in 1937 during the Japanese Imperial Era has become the Songshan Cultural and Creative Park, its modernist-style warehouses now converted into exhibition spaces, cafes, and design studios. Here, you’ll find the Taiwan Design Museum, whose galleries showcase the best of Taiwanese and international design, including recipients of the Golden Pin Design Award, a mark of innovative Taiwanese design that’s been awarded to products including bikes, teapots, and computer disk drives.

]Full Story at Passport

Taiwan Goes Big With Gay Films – 60 Movies, Two Weekends, Two Cities

Author: , September 27th, 2014

Night FlightWhile Taiwan is noted for producing numerous LGBTI-themed films for over a decade, the inaugural Taiwan International Queer Film Festival is said to be the first international queer film festival to be organized.

It will showcase 60 feature, documentary and short films from 30 countries in Taipei from Sep 26 to 30 and in Kaohsiung from Oct 3 to 7.

The LGBTI-themed films will cover a wide range of issues including family, aging, relationships and HIV/AIDS.

By Sylvia Tan – Full Story at Gay Star News

Twelve Surprising Gay Friendly Destinations

Author: , April 5th, 2014

Stockholm, SwedenThe gay travel industry is booming, in large part because of the increased worldwide acceptance of the LGBT community. From LGBT travel associations like Alt and the International Gay and Lesbian Travel Association (IGLTA), to LGBT cruise lines like Atlantis, Olivia and R Family Vacations, the gay and lesbian communities are becoming highly prized markets for the travel industry.

According to Merryn Johns, travel writer and Curve Magazine’s editor-in-chief, “[G]ay men and lesbians take at least four leisure trips per year, which is higher than their heterosexual counterparts, and fewer than 10% of LGBTs take organized trips of any kind. This makes gays and lesbians more frequent and more adventurous travelers than straight people.”

But LGBT travelers also seek different comforts. “Romance, seclusion and nature are important to lesbians when they travel, whereas gay men often seek out a scene or bars and clubs. While safety is important to lesbians when they travel, they … seek romance, outdoor adventure, culture and value for money,” she said in an interview with PolicyMic. “Not to mention some great beaches, which means they may seek out more exotic and far-flung destinations than other travelers.”

Authored By -Marcie Bianco See the Full Story at PolicyMic

Click here for gay travel resources.

Taipei, Taiwan Two Ways

Author: , March 6th, 2014

Taipei, Taiwan - Apple Maps

Apple Maps

As one of our favorite under-rated cities in Asia, Taipei has only recently started to get mainstream attention. (Case in point: The New York Times chose it as one of the 52 Places to Go in 2014). If you’re considering a trip, here are some popular highlights, including where to eat, where to shop, what to do, and where to stay. Plus we’ve included our favorite places where you’ll find fewer tourists and lots of locals.

EAT & SHOP

Popular Eats: Shilin Night Market is one of the most widely known – and therefore most tourist-packed – night market in the city. Since the relocation of most its food vendors into one building close to the main network of shops, it’s become even more of a tourist trap. To go where the locals go…

Under-the-Radar Eats: Raohe Night Market is more far-flung among the city’s night markets, but it’s arguably the best for food. Any of the typical dishes found here – stinky tofu, oyster omelettes, crispy chicken – make it worth the trek. If it’s browsing that interests you, try the less-crowded Tonghua Night Market (also known as Linjiang Night Market, because it’s located on Linjiang Street). There, enjoy Korean imports galore alongside cheap but delicious teppanyaki.

Authored By Christine Wei – See the Full Story at Sherman’s Travel

Click here for gay travel resources.